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June 22, 1990 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-06-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THIS ISSUE 75

SERVING DETROIT'S JEWISH COMMUNITY

Agencies Tighten Belts
For Soviet Resettlement

KIMBERLY LIFTON

Staff Writer

L

H

ocal Jewish agencies
are tightening their
belts for the 1990-91
fiscal year which began this
month, holding the line on
spending to prepare for a
projected influx of 700 Soviet
Jewish emigres and to settle
this past year's 793 new ar-
rivals.
The cost-cutting measure
follows an appeal by the
Jewish Welfare Federation,
which emulated a national
message by asking local
agencies to balance their
budgets based on the same
Allied Jewish Campaign
allocation they received last
year.
This week, the Federation
board of governors approved
1990 allocations from the
Allied Jewish Campaign, in-
creasing appropriations
funds to Israel and overseas
and domestic resettlement
services. The budget calls for
zero-based allocations to
most of its local agencies,

and for a decrease for the
majority of the 25 national
agencies supported by
Detroit's Campaign, in-
cluding the Anti-Defamation
League, Jewish War Veter-
ans, the Synagogue Council
of America and the Ameri-
can Jewish Congress.
Agency executives say
they are' studying their
respective financial situa-
tions to see where they can
cut corners without affecting
service levels. Some say they
may need to trim staff or cut
hours for non-salaried
employees. Others say they
will seek outside funding.
Those which charge for ser-
vices say they are re-
evaluating fees and may
hike rates. Waiting lists for
services could get longer.
"We are very acutely con-
cerned that the local agen-
cies continue to provide
high-quality services," Fed-
eration President Mark
Schlussel said. "We are fur-
ther aware that we are ask-
ing a great deal from our
responsive agencies.
"But our first priority

must be the saving of Jewish
lives. It has to be the
primary concern. Our agen-
cies will find means to pro-
vide high- quality services
during this period of
tremendous opportunity to
save the Soviet Jews. This
will test Detroit's ability to
prioritize."
Norbert Fruehauf, director
of planning for the Council
of Jewish Federations, said,
"The general feeling
throughout the country is
that the priority of Soviet
resettlement is such that it
affects all agencies. Budgets
are tight, and resources are
being stretched so that ser-
vices are not cut. There is no
question that this is creating
a financial crunch. But it is
necessary."
Detroit is spending $1
million a year for local reset-
tlement of Soviet Jews. In
addition, the community has
pledged $17.2 million for
Operation Exodus, the
international campaign ex-
pected to raise $420 million
to help Israel absorb and
resettle Soviet Jewish im-

JUNE 22, 1990 / 29 SIVAN 5750

Allied Jewish
Campaign Allocations

1990-91
1989-90
$ 3,314,926 $ 3,439,906
Community Services
3,717,625
3,717,625
Culture and Education
512,000
532,000
Community Relations
792,550
783,080
Central Services
572,494
572,494
Capital Needs
14,791,890
14,517,000
Overseas
641,275
661,275
National Agencies
$24,487,740
$24,078,400
Totals:
Individual agency allocations, Page 12.

migrants. Of Exodus funds,
$1.5 million will be placed
toward local resettlement
needs over the next three
years.
Federation leaders have
praised the agencies for
their cooperation, enabling
the Federation to set aside
$125,000 for domestic reset-
tlement.
Unlike Detroit, which ex-
pects to collect $27.5 million
in the regular Allied Jewish
Campaign for the 1990-91
year, many communities,
such as Boston, this year did
not meet their fund-raising
goals. Because of reduced
funds and high resettlement
costs, these communities
were forced to slash agency
allocations.

Just one of Detroit's 21
local agencies, the Jewish
Federation Apartments, is
facing a cut in Federation
appropriations, dropping
$5,000 to $36,427.
"We are blessed with the
fact that we are mostly
funded by the government,"
said Jewish Federation
Apartments Executive Di-
rector Helen Naimark. "But
if we have to tighten our
belts for a bit, we will do it.
Eighteen local agencies
will receive Campaign
allocations even with last
year. Two agencies will get
allocation hikes.
The Jewish Community
Council, which is the only
organization supported in
Continued on Page 12

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