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June 15, 1990 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-06-15

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LOCAL NEWS

Education



Continued from Page 1

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FRIDAY, JUNE 15, 1990

I BUSINESS & COMMERCIAL

the Community High School
have participated in joint
programs. He would
welcome more joint pro-
graming but believes there
is still a place in the com-
munity for synagogue-based
high schools.
The educational task force,
chaired by Joel Tauber, was
formed to address problems
that have arisen in the past
decade. Enrollment has been
steadily climbing at local
Jewish day schools, yet some
afternoon schools have been
struggling to attract
students.
Although Fisher has seen
some growth in United Heb-
rew Schools afternoon pro-
grams and Community Jew-
ish High School enrollments,
she admits, "The attitude
toward Jewish education
isn't what it was 30 or 40
years ago."
Results of an enrollment
survey conducted by The
Jewish News and the recent
Federation demographic
study of Detroit's Jewish
community show that the
majority of school-age Jew-
ish children are not enrolled
in formal Jewish education
classes.
Of 24,000 school-age
youngsters, nursery through
12th grade, just under one-
third, — 7,700 — are enroll-
ed in a Jewish nursery,
elementary or high school
program.
Although some educators
questioned the accuracy of
the Federation's population
figure, they admit they need
to convince parents and
children of the importance of
getting a Jewish education.
Margaret Eichner, head-
master at Yavneh Academy,
said some parents believe a
Jewish education ends at the
bar mitzvah "even though it
should be the beginning."
Other educators attribute
the low enrollment figures to
interfaith marriages and the
unwillingness of some
parents to drive long
distances to bring their chil-
dren to classes.
"The community is not
buying into Jewish edu-
cation," Aronson said. "We
need to start selling it. Jew-
ish education in all its forms
should be among the highest
priority of funding for the
Federation."
The consultant, Aronson
said, is symbolic of Federa-
tion's commitment to edu-
cation. The consultant would
design new programs and
implement services such as
teacher training and in-
novative marketing methods
for formal and informal Jew-
ish educational oppor-
tunities.

"We want a plan to pro-
vide overall support services
and attract more people to
Jewish education," Aronson
said. "We have to make it
more attractive for
youngsters, singles, families
and adults."
The consultant would
work with Jewish educators,
including the Agency for
Jewish Education, which
oversees four Jewish
elementary school branches,
special education programs,
the Community Jewish High
School and the Midrasha
College of Jewish Studies.
Federation last year
allocated $1.5 million for
Jewish education programs.
That money is divided
among four Jewish day
schools and the Agency for
Jewish Education.
Smaller day schools and
private afternoon, Sunday
and nursery schools, such as
those at Congregation
Shaarey Zedek, Beth Abra-
ham Hillel Moses and Tem-
ple Israel, do not receive
Federation funds.
A revamped system pro-
posed by the task force could
provide funding and pro-
gram options for these
organizations, enabling
them to work more closely
with others and possibly in-
tegrate programs.



Senior Group Aids
Hearing Impaired

The Senior Adult Depart-
ment of the Jewish Com-
munity Center at Maple-
Drake is planning to host a
group for the hearing
impaired.
Through participation in
social, educational and
physical education pro-
grams, hearing impaired
older adults will have the op-
portunity to participate in
group activities. The group
will offer an environment to
share experiences, learn of
adaptive devices and coping
methods, and entertainment
programs which will include
captioned movies.
For information, call Margo
Weitzer, 661-1000, Ext. 314.

Detroiters Attend
Meetings In Israel
Jerusalem — Soviet
aliyah, employment and
housing are expected to be
the major issue at the Jew-
ish Agency Assembly
meetings June 24-28.
Detroiters at the meetings
will include Jewish Agency
board members Mandell
Berman, Max Fisher and
Jane Sherman, and Robert
Aronson, Reva Kogan, Mar-
vin Novick and Joe Epel.

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