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May 11, 1990 - Image 48

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I NEWS I

THE ADULT STUDY COMMISSION

of

ADAT SHALOM SYNAGOGUE

proudly presents

Soviet Jews Settling
In East Germany

CANTOR LARRY VIEDER

CANTOR ISAAC GOODFRIEND

CANTOR ALBERTO MIZRAHI

in

A CANTORS CONCERT

THURSDAY, MAY 17
8 P.M.

The concert is sponsored by the Knopper Family in memory of
Sonia L. Knopper. Tickets may be obtained at
Adat Shalom Synagogue after May 9. There is no charge.

Adat Shalom Synagogue • 29901 Middlebelt Road
Farmington Hills, Michigan 48018 • 851-5100

ORCHARD PLACE

CONDOMINIUM

FARMINGTON HILL'S

Most Affordable Condominiums
only

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY

See a Salesperson for details

The opportunity of a lifetime is now available. It's all here: fireplaces,
two spacious bedrooms, large closets, balconies, and fully equipped
kitchens, tennis courts, clubhouse and a pool.
Come see the luxury and elegance you've waited for at a
price you never thought possible. Only at Orchard
Place Condominiums. Visit our newly decorated
models.

Phone 737-0890

Located at 30618 Orchard Lake Road
in Farmington Hills, on The East side
of Orchard Lake Road, South of 14
Mile Road. FARMINGTON HILLS
Hours 12-6,seven days a week

48

FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1990

East Berlin (JTA) — About
200 Soviet Jews have recent-
ly arrived in East Germany
and are settling there under
a program organized by the
government, according to
Irene Runge, a Jewish
cultural activist.
Runge is one of the leaders
of the Judischer
Kulturverein (Jewish
Cultural Association), an in-
dependent group that was
formed during last year's
democratic revolution in
East Germany. One of the
first public acts of the
association was to petition
the government to give ref-
uge to Soviet Jews who want
to leave their country.
Runge said the Soviet
Jews arrive here with East
German visas and live tem-
porarily in government-
sponsored reception centers
until they find jobs and
apartments.
The tiny Jewish commun-
ity of East Berlin, which
numbers only about 400 ac-
tive members, is now squab-
bling about which organiza-
tion should take care of and
welcome the Soviet Jews.
The official community
organization, which regards
the cultural association as
something of an upstart
group, wants to take care of
the new arrivals. But it in-
sists it will deal only with
those who are Jewish accor-
ding to halachah (traditional
religious law), as opposed to
those who claim to be of
"Jewish origin."
The cultural association,
which is open to all those
who call themselves Jews,
also wants to recruit the new
arrivals into its ranks.
Runge noted ironically
that one of the first issues to
surface in the newly freed
Jewish community of East
Berlin is who will take care
of the Soviet Jews, "most of
whom don't even want to be
Jewish."
In West Berlin, mean-
while, the president of the
World Jewish Congress said
last week that American
Jewish leaders would seek to
raise the quota on the
number of Soviet immi-
grants allowed to enter the
United States, if the present
rate of emigration continues.
Speaking at a news con-
ference on the occasion of the
WJC's first gathering ever
on German soil, Edgar
Bronfman said the current
50,000 quota was "very fair"
when it was set by the Bush

administration, in consulta-
tion with Congress, last fall.
At that time, he said, "we
were thinking of 100,000
Soviet Jews a year coming
out. But if the numbers con-
tinue to swell, then there
will be a concerted effort by
the organized American
Jewish community to raise
the quota, and I think it will
be successful," he said.
As recently as last week,
officials of the New York-
based Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society indicated they
would seek the same ceiling
of 50,000 Soviet refugees for
the next fiscal year, which
begins Oct. 1.

m

l LOCAL NEWS

Beth El Hosts
Cantorial Concert

Temple Beth El will host
the area's first all women's
cantorial concert 7:30 p.m.
May 20 in the temple.
Beth El's cantor, Gail
Hirschenfang, has planned a
program of modern works,
Israeli songs, traditional
chazzanut, love songs and a
selection from Fiddler on the
Roof
Cantor Hirschenfang will
be joined by Cantor Roslyn
Barak of Congregation
Emanu-el in San Francisco
and Cantor Faith Steinsnyder
Gurney, High Holiday cantor
at Beth El Congregation in
New London, Conn.
The cantors will be accom-
panied by flautist Kim
Rosner Kelly, harpist Patricia
Masri-Fletcher and organist
Gale Kramer.
There is a charge. For infor-
mation call the temple,
851-1000.

WB Young Israel
Plans Anniversary

Young Israel of West Bloom-
field will hold a cocktail
reception in honor of its first
anniversary 8:30 p.m. June 4
at the Allen House in down-
town Birmingham.
There is a charge. For infor-
mation, call Ann Wanetik,
737-4838; or Renee Mut-
chnick, 626-6317.

Temple Plans
Blood Drive

Temple Israel will hold a
blood drive 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
May 20 at the temple.
Every donor will receive a
stuffed toy animal in
appreciation.

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