100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

April 27, 1990 - Image 84

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

CIU11111)

Tile Artist

dining room, carry-out and trays

Continued from preceding page

• breakfast • lunch • dinner
• after-theater • kiddie menu

open tuesdays thru sundays
10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

968-0022

lincoln shopping center, 10 1/2 mile & greenfield, oak park

Deli Unique

25290 GREENFIELD North of 10 Mile Rd.

967-39991

CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS

-THE GOLD COIN

I

lyt

OPEN 7 DAYS — YOUR HOST: HOWARD LEW
SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE

COMPLETE
CARRY-OUT
AVAILABLE

NEW A LA CARTE DINNERS UNDER $5

24480 W. 10 MILE (IN TEL-EX PLAZA)

West of Telegraph

353-7848

GOLDEN BOWL Restaurant

221% COOLIDGE AT 9 MILE In A & P Shopping Center
398-5502 or 398-5503
DINE IN & CARRY-OUT

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE & AMERICAN CUISINE

OPEN 1 DAYS-Mon.-Thurs. 11-10, Fri. & Sat. 11-11, Sun. & Holidays 1 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Your Chef: FRANK ENG

• Banquet Facilities

Irolden Phoenix

Chinese-American Restaurant
Cantonese, Szechuan & American
Dining & Carry-Out
OPEN 7 DAYS ... Mon.-Thurs. 11:30-9:30, Fri. & Sat. 11:30-11, Sun. 12-9:30
642-8386
4067 W. Maple Rd. Just East of Telegraph

THE GPEAT WALE

SERVING YOUR FAVORITE EXOTIC
DRINKS & CHOICE COCKTAILS

PRIVATE DINING ROOM
• BANQUETS • PARTIES • BUSINESS MEETINGS

Your host . . . HENRY LUM

Businessmen's Luncheons • Carry-outs • Catering

476-9181
(Drakeshire Shopping Center) • 35135 Grand River

-1,1111
..



HOA KOW INN

Specializing In Cantonese, Szechuan & Mandarin Foods

Open Daily 11 to 10:30, Sat. 11 to 12 Mid., Sun. 12 to 10:30
— Carry-Out Service —

13715 W. 9 MILE, W. of Coolidge • Oak Park • 547-4663

KABOB GRILL

Authentic Lebanese Cuisine

I CARRY-OUT & CATERING AVAILABLE

29702 SOUTHFIELD AT 12 1 /2 MILE (In Southfield Plaza)

557-5990

MON.-THURS. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. FRI. & SAT. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
CLOStD SUNDAYS

DINING OUT IS BETTER AT A
JEWISH NEWS
RECOGNIZED RESTAURANT

76

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1990

tiles, deepens the colors and
gives the paint a glossier
finish. "It does come to life"
in the kiln, she says.
Since the colors Hecht
paints on the tiles change in
the kiln, there is some of
what she calls "educated
guesswork" involved in her
art.
"It's not such an exact
science that anybody can
know exactly (how a piece will
turn out). There's a lot of
unknowns. You can fire the
same thing with the same
paint twice and it will not
necessarily come out the
same way."
The transition in the kiln is
even greater for those who
fashion their own tiles. But
Hecht says, "I really have no
desire to make my own tiles.
I don't think my work is about
pottery. It is painting. It's
kind of a meshing. It's fired
painting. It's not about the
clay. It's about the glaze and
the brushstrokes and the col-
ors and the composition."
Since she began with tiles,
Hecht has not worked in
another medium.
"There's a richness to the
surface," she says. "It's more
towards oil painting, but it's
different. I can build up the
surface," using several coats
of overglaze in certain parts of
a piece, to give it a three-
dimensional effect.
"For me, it opened every-
thing up," she continues. "All
kinds of possibilities. There
are tons of ideas that I haven't
had a chance to try yet."
Hecht's home is filled with
her work, including sculp-
tures and paintings from her
pre-tile days. Her intricate
patterns liven her kitchen
and bathroom. More personal
work, such as pictures of her
husband, sons Benji and Sam,
and the family dogs, appear
in rooms throughout her Bir-
mingham home.
But it's Hecht's commis-
sions for others that keep her
busy these days. She is asked
to perform a variety of work,
ranging from small design
patterns to large portraits.
Some of her customers know
what they want, while others
are wide open to suggestions.
"It runs the gamut," Hecht
says. "I usually help them
think it through."
As a hobby, she likes to ad-
vise clients on other aspects
of room design that will com-
plement her work.
Of her most famous clients
to date, Lee Iacocca "was very
pleasant to deal with," Hecht
says. After describing the
type of work he wanted in his
Bloomfield Hills kitchen, he
required Hecht to lay out
specifically what she wanted
to do.

Hecht works on a new piece.

"I'm not a sales person. I
frequently felt that I was my
own worst enemy in that
department. But here is the
ultimate salesman. And to
analyze what he wanted and
do it to his satisfaction was
very gratifying."
Although Hecht has
displayed her work in many
art shows in recent years, she
still has trouble when others
try to categorize her pieces.
"I call them paintings,
because they're not about
ceramics. I end up falling
through the cracks some-
times with shows because I
really can't enter a ceramics
show and in some realms it's
got to be oil or watercolor or
they won't consider it a pain-
ting," Hecht says.
"I've never been on a trend
in art. It's not about that to
me. It's not easily labeled. It's
very individual."
Another problem is that
with so many commissions,
Hecht does not own much
work she can show. Partly as
an answer to that dilemma,
she occasionally takes time to
work on something of her
own.
"I don't care if it's saleable,"
she says. "It can be personal.
It has to be from the heart.
Every now and then I have to
do something that's totally
without regard to other peo-
ple's needs."
But, she says, working to
please other people's needs
does not inhibit her
creativity.
"I enjoy the parameters. It's
just that sometimes I need no
parameters. But I find it very
challenging to have to come
up with a solution for a poten-
tially very restrictive situa-
tion and do it right. I find that
to be very challenging even
though a lot of artists, I think,
would find that to be a total
nightmare.
"To me art is about com-
munication. Even when I'm

at the point where I don't
want to paint another basket
of flowers, once I'm in the
middle of it, I don't quit until
it's a work of art. So it
becomes very gratifying even
if I'm not that excited when
I get started."
Hecht considers all of her
work art. "That's why I can
be just as happy working on
a kitchen as I can working on
a picture for a show.
Although Hecht says that
she will not work exclusively
with tiles for the rest of her
life, she adds that she has not
taken tile art "to the limit"
yet.
"I'm not tired of it and I
don't think I will be for
years."
Her work will soon be
featured in two books, one of
which, The Guild, is a
sourcebook for architects
throughout the country,
meaning that Hecht is likely
to remain busy for as long as
she wants.
"I'm doing pieces that I'm
happy with and that other
people are happy with," she
says.
"You have a concept; you
see it come to life. And it real-
ly does enrich people's lives.
That means a lot to people
and it means a lot to me." ❑

String Quartet
Plays Mozart

An all-Mozart concert to be
performed in Holland by the
Lafayette String Quartet will
be previewed at Oakland
University 8 p.m. May 6 in
Varner Recital Hall. Later in
May, the quartet will play the
same selections at the Mozart
Week Festival in Zeist,
Holland.
The Lafayette was the only
American quartet invited to
perform at the festival.
There is a charge. For infor-
mation, call the box office,
370-3013.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan