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April 13, 1990 - Image 99

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TRAVEL

Jewish Zurich

A A

Continued from preceding page

• 'NI A

WAIF

Wall Street can wait a year.
Law School can wait a year.
The Rat Race can wait a year.
BUT ISRAEL CAN'T WAIT!

Later, Jews were periodical-
ly expelled from and re-
admitted to Zurich. Then, in
the 17th century, they were
expelled from all of Switzer-
land. But the history of per-
secution ended in 1866 when
a new Swiss constitution gave
Jews full freedom.
Today, Jews enjoy security
and often prosperity in
Zurich. They are bankers,
merchants, watchmakers,
lawyers, academicians. And
they live in an environment
that is far different from that
of Jews here in earlier
centuries.
In fact, this is one of the few
cities in Europe where a
church is of special interest to
Jewish travelers because of
its enthusiastic support of a
Jewish artist.
The Fraumunster is a
distinctive landmark in the

OTZMA

(Now in its fifth year)

•It's a 10-month fellowship program in Israel for only $1,000.*
'It's travel, study, work and exploration.
'It's hard. It's fun. It's the best adventure you'll ever have.
•It's for outstanding young men and women, age 19-24.
•It's easy to find out more.

For information, call one of these Otzma graduates:

city, with its spires reflected
in the waters of the Limmat.
Its five stained glass windows
were created by Marc Chagall
after church officials saw an
exhibit of his work in the ci-
ty's art museum in 1967 and
promptly commissioned him
to do the windows.
Four of the windows have
Jewish motifs: One shows Old
Testament prophets; another
has a design symbolizing the
law; a third is the Jacob win-
dow; and a fourth shows
Jerusalem in images of past
and present.
This church with its
Chagall windows stands in
contrast to the earlier era of
persecution. Today, Zurich's
Jews are fully integrated in
the city where they comprise
the largest group of German-
speaking Jews in the
world. ❑

Passion Play Gets Poor
Review From Jews

Alysa Goldberg
EMU, 485-2495

Wendy Littky
MSU, (517) 332-2765

Lisa Kruman
U-M, 994-3979

or call

Yefet Ozery, Israel Program Center
6600 W. Maple Road • West Bloomfield, MI 48322 • (313) 661-5440
Deadline for registration, April 30, 1990

*In Michigan, a project of the Jewish Welfare Federation of Detroit. Funded by United Jewish Charities
in partnership with the Jewish Welfare Federation and the Jewish Agency for Israel.

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CRISPIAN CADILLAC

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HAPPY PASSOVER

100

FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1990

New York (JTA) — Three
national human rights
organizations are urging
producers of the centuries-
old Oberammergau Passion
play in Germany to revise
the drama and eliminate its
negative portrayal of Jews.
The play, which deals with
the crucifixion of Jesus, has
been performed at the
beginning of every decade
since 1663.
Performed by the local
villagers, it has brought the
Bavarian Alpine village a
flourishing tourist business.
Although the play has
been rewritten several times
since the end of World War
II, out of consideration for
Jewish sensibilities, it still
depicts Jews as responsible
for the crucifixion.
The National Conference
of Christians and Jews, the
American Jewish Com-
mittee and the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith in a joint statement
welcomed efforts by the
Oberammergau officials to
reduce anti-Jewish
stereotyping, but expressed
regret that "some elements
of. the play continue to por-
tray Judaism in a negative
light.
"Particularly disturbing is
the retention of the 'blood
curse' from Matthew: 27,
which has been used for cen-
turies to support the charge
of deicide against the Jewish
people and frequently as a
justification of violence
against them."
Two Catholic theologians
from Temple University,
Leonard Swidler and Gerard

Sloyan, in consultations
with rabbis and lay leaders
of the three organizations,
have developed a brochure
titled "Guidelines for the
1990 Oberammergau Pas-
sion Play and Other Passion
Plays," to help viewers
better understand the prob-
lem of anti-Semitism in pas-
sion plays.
A half a million tourists
are expected to see the
drama this summer.

AJCongress
Announces Trips

The American Jewish Con-
gress International Travel
Program will begin the 1990
tour season with its new
World Travel Guide. High-
lights in the 136-page
brochure are:
• "A Tale of Three Cities,"-
led by David Ruderman, pro-
fessor of Jewish history at
Yale, is a 15-day visit to
Venice,
Prague
and
Amsterdam.
• "Eastern Europe High-
lights" will give the traveler
12 days to explore the
changes and the excitement
in Hungary, Poland, and
Czechoslovakia.
• "Eastern Europe: Jewish
Roots" is a 19-day visit to
Hungary, Poland, Czechoslo-
vakia, Bulgaria and Holland.
• "Israel with the K-I-D-S"
is designed especially for
families with young children.
For information, or to
receive a copy of the World
Travel Guide, call the
American Jewish Congress,
at (212) 879-4588; or
1-800-221-4694.

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