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April 06, 1990 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I PASSOVER imilmw•••'••••••'

You Can Make A Difference

There are 1,000 Soviet refugees
that need our help resettling in the Detroit area

This is your opportunity to save
on a new sectional or sofa for your home and
help these Russian families in need.
Here's how you can participate:

From now until April 30th, we are offering you a trade-in allowance
of up to $100.00 on your purchase of any new sofa; or an allowance
of up to $200.00 on your purchase of any sectional arrangement. (Your
used furniture must be in good, useable condition.) We will make
arrangements to pick up your donated furniture at no charge.

5

We Hope You Will Be Able To Assist Us
In This Most Important Community Effort

All donations are tax deductible

renT

FURNITURE

Mon & Thurs 10-9; rues, Wed, Fri & Sat 10-5:30
126 E. 14 Mile, Clawson
1914 Telegraph Road, Bloomfield Hills
1 block east of Livernois
1/2 mile north of Square Lake
(Clearance Center)
in the Bloomfield Design P117a
583-1475
338-7716



BETH ABRAHAM HILLEL MOSES

J.E.E.P. (Jewish Education Enrichment Program)
in cooperation with the Midrasha College of Jewish Studies

PRESENTS:
A Special Lecture by

A A.

DR. ZVI GITELMAN

Professor of Political Science and Judaic Studies
University of Michigan

THE JEWISH EXPERIENCE: MAKING THE TRANSITION FROM THE CLOSED
GHETTOS OF EASTERN EUROPE TO THE OPEN SOCIETY OF AMERICA.

Let Us Explore Together:

• Jewish values, institutions and practices which have their roots in the Shtetl Society of Eastern Europe
• How these Jewish values, institutions and practices have contributed to Jewish life and have been
altered in America.
• How we can proceed in the future to maximize the heritage which is ours.
BETH ABRAHAM HILLEL MOSES
Location:

5075 W. Maple Rd., West Bloomfield, Michigan — 851-6880

Date & Time

April 19, 1990 at 7:45 p.m.

The community is welcomed and encouraged to attend
Slides • No Charge • Refreshments Will Be Served

TREND
Applegate Square

SPRING
MERCHANDISE
ARRIVING DAILY

Men's & Boys'

352-424V

CLASSIFIEDS •
GET RESULTS!

Call The Jewish News

354.6060

30

FRIDAY, APRIL 6, 1990

Soviet Family Relishes
Passover In Israel

Jerusalem (JTA) — Igor
and Inna Uspensky are ex-
cited about celebrating their
first Festival of Freedom in
Israel, after the Soviet au-
thorities refused to grant
them emigration visas for 10
years.
The Uspenskys' saga is
that of a three-generation
Soviet Jewish family, star-
ting with persecution during
the Stalin era and ending
with the fourth generation
being born in Jerusalem
—"a real Sabra," says Igor.
Igor and Inna Uspensky,
now in their 50s, first ap-
plied to emigrate in 1980,
together with their son, then
a teen-ager, and Igor's
mother, now 77.
The official reason their
applications were denied
was that Igor's mother, Irina
Voronkevich, had knowl-
edge of classified informa-
tion.
Until her pension in 1976,
Irina worked as a biologist
for the Ministry of
Agriculture and although
security clearance is valid
for only three years, refusal
for secrecy is still the reason
used today for refusing to
grant her an emigration
visa.
The Uspenskys, who are
now staying at the Canada
House absorption center in
the Jerusalem neighborhood
of East Talpiyot, are a smil-
ing, grey-haired couple
happy to have their son,
daughter-in-law and grand-
daughter in the same
building, but sad about Ig-
or's elderly mother still in
refusal in Moscow.
"Her last application was
only a month ago, and
although it was denied, we
are hopeful that the au-
thorities will let her out
soon," Igor said last month.
Asked why, in their opi-
nion, the Soviet authorities
refuse to release her mother-
in-law, Inna offers her own
theory: "I think (the au-
thorities) want to show the
Russians, and especially the
Jews in Russia, that despite
the new situation, with
perestroika and glasnost,
they can still do what they
want."
"They want to show the
people who's who, and who
has the power. It is the same
as it has always been in
Russia," Igor adds.
The Uspensky family is
aware every day of the dif-
ference between a life in
freedom and their former life
in the Soviet Union. Three

months after arriving here,
they point out the differ-
ences in their everyday
lives.
"For example," Igor says,
"on Purim, we went to the
Liberty Bell Garden to wat-
ch the costumes. Everyone
was smiling and laughing.
The children run around
happy; everything is full of
colors."
Inna confirms Igor's ob-
servations: "There, in
Russia, the children are full
of complexes and serious,
while here, they are
laughing, feeling secure in
their right to smile and be
what they are supposed to be
— children."

"We have received
so many invitations
for the Seder that
we don't know
what to do."
— Inna Uspensky

The Uspenskys are a small
family. Apart from Inna's
brother, Alexander Ioffe, a
mathematics profeSsor in
Haifa who immigrated here
two years ago, they have
only their one son, and Igor's
mother.
Irina Voronkevich's father
was arrested and killed in
1938 during the Stalin
purges. When her husband,
Igor's father, was killed in
action during World War II
at the Finnish front in 1943,
Mrs. Voronkevich never
remarried, and went back to
using her maiden name.
The Uspensky's son, whose
Russian name was Slava,
changed his name to Hillel
when he became religious.
"We have no problems with
him becoming religious,"
Igor and Inna agree.
"For example," Igor ex-
plains, "if we are going
somewhere together on
Shabbat, we walk the stairs
together instead of using the
elevator, but Hillel knows
that when he is not around,
we use the elevator and elec-
tric appliances."
Now, after three months in
Jerusalem, their main prob-
lem, they say, is deciding
where to spend their first
Passover in Israel. "We have
received so many invitations
for the Seder that we simply
don't know what to do," Inna
smiles. "Perhaps we'll go to
my brother in Haifa, or to
friends in Jerusalem."

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