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March 23, 1990 - Image 47

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

(NEWS'

Light's Jewellers

Court Ordered

E.C. Doubles Palestinian
Aid To $13.2 Million

GOING OUT OF
BUSINESS SALE

Chapter 11 Court Cases #89-08477-G • #89-07428-G

Light Jewellers has closed the Meadowbrook Village Mall store
and consolidated inventory into the Birmingham store at

280 N. Woodward.

The Bankruptcy Court has ordered the entire inventory from
both locations to be sold to pay creditors and to....

Close Their Doors Forever!

ALL INVENTORY MUST BE SOLD

OFF

At
Savings
Up To

Retail
Price

FINE JEWELRY: Diamonds, Emeralds, Rubies, Sapphires, 14Kt. & 18KL Gold
and Platinum Handmade Jewelry, Lustrous Pearls and Other Precious Gems.
FAMOUS NAME WATCHES: Movado, Concord, and many other name brands.

LARGE SELECTION OF FINE GIFTWARE: Lenox, International, Reed & Barton,
Gorham, Royal Doulton, and many other collectables from around the world.

Don't miss this opportunity to Buy
at Going Out of Business Prices

NOTHING HELD BACK THE VAULTS WILL BE EMPTIED

Light's

FINE

JEWELLERS

280 N. Woodward • One block North of Maple • Birmingham

Daily 10:00 to 5:30, Thursday and Friday til 9:00

All Major Credit Cards Accepted • Phone 647-3550

0 SJC

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354-6060

■.••■■

as. • •.• •

AIL 10\41

Brussels (JTA) — The Eu-
ropean Community has
decided to double its aid to
Palestinians in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip over
the next two years.
However, a report that
the E.C. will rescind its anti-
Israel sanctions by April was
denied.
The E.C., which is pro-
viding $6.6 million in 1990,
will increase the amount to
$13.2 million a year in both
1991 and 1992.
Sources at the European
Commission, the executive
body of the E.C., said the
money would go for welfare
and education and was aim-
ed at "preserving the collec-
tive future of the Palestinian
people by supporting their
economic and social devel-
opment."
The E.C. has contributed
$185 million to Palestinians
in the territories since 1971,
much of it channelled
through the United Nations
Relief and Works Agency.
"What we want is to use
this financial aid to improve
the living standards of the
Palestinians," an E.C. offi-
cial said.
The E.C. at the same time
is pressing Israel to
facilitate the transfer of
funds to non-governmental
relief agencies in the ad-
ministered territories.
But legislation is pending
in the Knesset to impose
more restrictive rules for the
transfer of money, to keep it
out of the hands of intifada
activists.
Another area of conflict
between Israel and the E.C.
has to do with the direct ex-
port of Palestinian
agricultural produce from
the territories to E.C. mem-
ber nations.
The E.C. prevailed on
Israel last year to allow Pa-
lestinian producers to export
fruits and vegetables to
Europe under their own
label, bypassing Israel's offi-
cial export agencies.
Now the European Com-
mission wants Israel to scrap
import duties on goods fi-
nanced by the Community or
any of its member states
which are shipped to the ter-
ritories.
Meanwhile, a European
Community official has de-
nied an Israeli newspaper
report that the body will
reverse itself on sanctions
against Israel, rescinding
them before the next
meeting of the community's
foreign ministers in April.

"As far as I know, the
elements which prompted
the European Community to
decide several measures of
displeasure against Israel
have not changed, so I don't
think that the E.C. position
has been modified so far," an
E.C. official said.
The meeting, which is at-
tended by Israel's foreign
minister and his 12 col-
leagues of the European
Community, reviews the co-
operation between the E.C.
and Israel, as well as devel-
opments in the Mideast.
The European Parliament,
the E.C.'s legislative body,
voted in January to recom-
mend measures against
Israel, such as freezing the
scientific cooperation bet-
ween the E.C. and Israel, be-
cause of its alleged contempt
for hiimn-n rights in the ad-
ministered territories and
for closing Palestinian uni-
versities in the West Bank.
The European Commis-
sion, the E.C.'s executive
body, which is based in
Brussels, followed suit by
postponing the signing of an
agreement on energy coop-
eration, during the visit of
Israel's Energy Minister
Moshe Shahal here at the
end of January

Boston Jews
Win Battle

Boston (JTA) — Beth El
Shaddai, a "messianic Jew-
ish'' group that installed
itself in the predominantly
Jewish Boston suburb of
Sharon five years ago, mov-
ed away in December after a
singular lack of success in
their missionizing.
Nevertheless, the Or-
thodox, Conservative and
Reform rabbis of Sharon are
breathing easier, and are
congratulating each 'other
for ridding the community of
"imposters" — Christians
who claim to be Jews.
"We regard this as a par-
tial victory," said Rabbi
Meir Sendor of Young Israel,
the Orthodox congregation.
"They were in the heart of
Sharon, holding services,
canvassing door-to-door."
To counteract the pro-
selytizing, the three con-
gregations pooled resources.
Young Israel, the Reform
Temple Sinai and Conser-
vative Temple Israel held
forums, invited speakers, set
up a library and arranged
workshops on countermis-
sionizing.

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