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March 23, 1990 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BACKGROUND

The HIGHEST Money Market Rate Among
Major Financial Institutions in the Detroit
Metropolitan Area for

313 Consecutive Weeks

Anti-Semitism Is Soviet Weed
Growing As Freedom Blossoms

HELEN DAVIS

INSTANT LIQUIDITY

INTEREST RATES AS OF 3-14-90

MONEY MARKET RATES'

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

6.65

Franklin Savings

6.40
6.25
5.85
6.00
5.85
5.90
5.90
5.25

National Bank of Detroit
Manufacturers
Comerica
First Federal Savings Bank & Trust
Michigan National of Detroit
Standard Federal
First Federal of Michigan
First of America

•Based on $10,000 deposit. Some minimum deposit requirements may be lower.
Higher rates may be available for larger deposits.

6 MONTH HIGH INCOME C.D.

8.00%

8.30%

Annual Percentage Rate

Annual Yield

Monthly check may be issued or reinvested to another
Franklin Savings Account

Balance of $5000 or more. Limited time offer.

Early withdrawal subject to penalty.

Franklin
Bank

SAVINGS

SOUTHFIELD

26336 Twelve Mile Road

GROSSE POINTE
BIRMINGHAM
WOODS

20247 Mack Avenue

(313) 358-5170

(313) 881.5200

FDIC Insured

Call Toll-Free
1-800.5274447

OC Pcnnev

MARNI 94 1C1011

479 South Woodward

(313) 647.0000

FOWL MONO
LOOP

Foreign Correspondent

A

re Soviet Jews stan-
ding on the edge of a
precipice? Are they
once again in danger of be-
ing swallowed up by ancient
hatred? Is the awful history
of anti-Semitism about to be
replayed even as the Soviet
Union remakes its
totalitarian face and enters
the brave new world of dem-
ocratic enlightenment?
British Jews and non-Jews
— community leaders, Soviet
Jewry campaigners, politi-
cians — who have visited the
Soviet Union recently are
unanimous in reporting that
dark clouds, in the form of
huge question marks, hang
over the immediate future of
the estimated 3 million
Soviet Jews.
Dr. Lionel Kopelowitz,
president of the Board of
Deputies, a secular umbrella
organization for British
Jews which closely monitors
events in the Soviet Union,
believes all the pieces are in
place for a potential catas-
trophe.
Anti-Semitism is deeply
entrenched, he says. "Street
anti- Semitism" is again be-
ing witnessed in the Soviet
Union and is not confined to
organizations like Pamyat,
the xenophobic Russian na-
tionalist movement.
"The economic situation is
desperate. People are
hungry. They're asking
themselves why things are
as they are. I am as worried
about this," he declares, "as
about the rise of Hitler in
the '30s."
Rita Eker, head of the
London-based Women's
Campaign for Soviet Jewry,
which is in constant contact
with thousands of Jewish
families throughout the
Soviet Union, was recently
allowed to visit the Soviet
Union after an eight-year
succession of "nyets" to visa
applications. She en-
countered a new kind of anti-
Semitism.
Eight years ago, she says,
the Soviet authorities and
the KGB practiced an
"organized, subtle" form of
anti-Semitism. "Now people
are not bothered about
shouting their abuse at
Jews. Now it's Jew-baiting
time."
Anti-Semitic leaflets,
many produced by Pamyat,
have been distributed in
cities and towns throughout

Artwork from the Los AngelesTimes by Richard Milholland. Copyright 0 1989, Richard Milholtand.

the Soviet Union. They
blame Soviet Jews for the
current political uncertain-
ty, the economic crisis, for
Chernobyl, for initiating the
Bolshevik revolution. The
threatened reward is a
pogrom set for May 5, the
birthday of Karl Marx.
For all that, however,
Britain's Chief Rabbi, Lord
Jakobovits, interjects a note
of caution against over- ex-
aggerating the threat. The
problem, he agrees, is
"certainly very bad in terms
of fear. Everybody is afraid."
But, says Jakobovits, who
traveled to Moscow for a con-
ference earlier this year, "I
don't think we should sow
the seeds of panic. In Russia,
anti-Semitism is endemic,
and it would be dangerous to
set in motion a sense of panic
among Jews who cannot
escape overnight."
The leaders of Britain's
Jewish community are not
alone in their concern about

these negative developments
in the Soviet Union.
An eight-person human
rights group, comprising
non-Jewish British
parliamentarians and senior
journalists, recently visited
the Soviet Union and re-
ported that human rights
abuses are still too serious
and too widespread for the
British government to at-
tend next year's human
rights conference in Moscow,
a follow-up to the original
Helsinki talks.
In a statement, the group
went out of its way to report
on the "manifestly genuine
fears" of Soviet Jews it met
and to express the view that
"the rise of anti-Semitism is
a real cause for concern."
"Anti-Semitism," noted
Paul Boateng, a prominent
Labor Party parliamen-
tarian and member of the
group, "is a light sleeper in
the Soviet Union, and we
found it there." '-

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