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March 02, 1990 - Image 140

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-03-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

g't
ptit iisW• The Faces, And Costumes, Of Purim

By MARY KORETZ

Each month in this space,
L'Chayim will present a Yiddish
lesson entitled, "Du Redst Yiddish?
(Do You Speak Yiddish?)," whose
aim is to encourage further study of
Yiddish. The lesson will include a
brief story utilizing the Yiddish
words to be studied and a
vocabulary list with English
translations. Two books which may
be helpful for beginning Yiddish
students are Yiddish for Beginners
by Dr. Joffen and Der Yiddisher
Lerer by Goldin. Weinreich's
English-Yiddish Dictionary also may
be useful.
The lessons were prepared by
Mary Koretz of Oak Park. She has
taught both children's and adult
classes in Yiddish at the Workmen's
Circle.
Following is this month's
lesson:
Purim, in my childhood home,
was two large wooden shislen (one
normally used for chopping fish and
one for chopping liver), filled with
bawb and arbis. The chick peas
were generously covered with fefer.
The bowls were placed on the tish
and could be eaten at will, like
candy or nis. Hamantashen were
the other customary edible. Special
preparations for a festive onbeisn
were made. Most of our holidays
were marked by the
overconsumption of food. We
ingested our yidishkeit; it truly
became a part of us.
Very often we had relatives visit
us or mir were invited to their
homes. The holiday revived zikorns
among the dervaksener, of der
haym. They spoke of Purimshpilers,
of carrying shalach mones of
gragers and of hindlach swung
around kep, in the synagogues, as a
symbol of Haman. Zay spoke of
these zachn as though they existed
nor in Europe. Perhaps because
they were secular Jews, they had
dropped some of these practices.
Shpeter, I was lerenen, that
these customs still prevailed tsvishn
a groise number of yidn in America,
particularly religious ones.
When I was alt genug to teach
in a secular Sunday school, I found
that they had their aygenir version
of Purim observance. The meise of
Esther was dertsaylt to the kinder
before Purim. On the yom toy the
children came costumed. They
represented the characters in the
megile. Various games were devised
such as pin the bord on Mordecai.
Prizes were awarded to geviners of

L-8

FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1990

mind of an American New Year's
tsvish
the games and for the best
groise
celebration. And so it appears, that
costumes.
yidn
the observance of Purim wears
In Israel, Purim is gepravet in
alt
different ways, both in the kibbutzim many ponimer as well as costumes.
genug
and in the shtet. According to
aygenir
people ver visited Israel during
bowls meise
shislen
Purim, the following represent
beans dertsaylt
bawb
etleche differences.
peas kinder
arbis
In Kibbutz Gal-On, the
pepper yom tov
fefer
yungvarg observe the holiday in
table megile
tish
their special children's home. They
nuts bord
nis
wore costumes of farshidene kinds,
a three-cornered geviners
hamantashen
not necessarily relevant to the
cookie gepravet
meise of Esther. More like the
dinner shtet
onbeisn
Halloween costumes of America.
Jewishness ver
yidishkeit
The adults held a bazunderer party
we etleche
mir
in the large dining hall. Most came
memories
yungvarg
zikorns
muzik,
costumed. They were skits,
adults farshidene
dervaksener
tants, vein, esnvarg and gragers.
home bazunderer
der haym
The party lasted veit in the night.
Purim players muzik
Purimshpilers
In Jerusalem, and other cities,
goodies sent tants
shalach mones
mentshn send shalach mones and
during Purim vein
hold private parties. The nature of
noisemakers esnvarg
gragers
the farzamln depend on the people
chickens veit
hindlach
involved.
head mentshn
I have a picture of a Purim
kep
they farzamln
partty, held at the haym of friends.
zay
things haym
They live in Bat Yam, a senior adult zachn
only bashtayt
housing facility. The party bashtayt
nor
later
trogn
of a festive dinner with the guests
shpeter
taught ponimer
trogn paper hats. It puts one in
lerenen

Vocabulary

S

among
large
Jews
old
enough
own
story
told
children
holiday
story of Purim
bear
winners
observed
cities
who
several
youngsters
various
separate
music
dances
wine
food
far
people
gathering
home
consists
wearing
faces

ote` Pick Patronymic Root From Pinchus

By BE I 1Y PROVIZER STARKMAN
The family name WETZLAR, is
of geographic origin and indicates
residence in the Hessian city of
Wetzlar. Paul Diamant discusses
this family in Archiv For Judische
Familien, a genealogical journal
published in Vienna, 1912-1916. He
also wrote about the other Jewish
families living in Wetzlar from the
twelfth century and the origins of
their family names.

PICK is a surname of
patronymic root showing descent
from an ancestor named Pinchus.
The family LOUSADA claims
ancestry from the Spanish
Grandees. They are of Sephardic
origin and lived in Jamaica for many
generations. The JEWISH
ENCYCLOPEDIA, 12 vols., (N.Y.,
1901-1906) has a crest and family
tree.

The surname GLASS is of
occupational root and was chosen
by an ancestor to note his
involvement in the sale of
manufacture of glass. GLASSMAN

and GLAZER come from the same
source. The Universal Jewish
Encyclopedia, 10 vols., (N.Y.,
1939-1948) has an article about the
English writer, Montague Glass
(1877-1934.)
SCHWAB as a surname is of
Ashkenazic root and tells us that
this family once resided in Swabia,
Germany. The family later moved on
to France and Moravia. The Leo
Baeck Institute of New York has a
Schwab family tree beginning in the
year 1495.
LIVERANT is an Ashkenazic
name indicating occupation. In
Yiddish liverant means "caterer."
The family name SONNTAG,
meaning "Sunday," in
Yiddish/German, was considered
one of the beautiful names. An
official may have been bribed to
assign this name. The name may
have been requested because of an
anniversary or birth date, that took
place on Sunday.
Some of our Jewish family
names were adopted from
neighborhood locations. A Dutch

family chose VAN DAM (near the
dike) as their name.
CASTELNUOVO, is another name
that falls into this category. This
cognomen literally means, "new
castle." It is of Sephardic origin and
was adopted by a Spanish,
Portuguese or Italian Jew to indicate
that he lived near the new castle.
ALGRANTI is also a Sephardic
surname. It illustrates the eight
centuries of Moorish influence upon
Spain and its Jewish inhabitants.
Algranti is from the Arabic, "a son
of Granada."
The Ashkenazic name TAMBOR
is of occupational origin and in
Yiddish means "drummer."
Someone in your family played the
drums.
Some Yiddish/German names
end in "stamm" which translates to
"ancestry." KOHNSTAMM thus
indicates priestly origins.

Betty Provizer Starkman is the
past president and founder of the
genealogical branch of the Jewish
Historical Society of Michigan.

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