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February 23, 1990 - Image 68

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ENTERTAINMENT I

THE
HERATON
OAKS
TAKES
DINNER
HEATRE
NE STEP
RTHER.

Off The `Wuhl' Comedy
Planned At Mark Ridley's

STEVE HARTZ

Special to The Jewish News

L

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1990

QUALITY AND CONSISTENCY IS OUR PRIORITY!

1

ast year he appeared in
Gotham City and
received a smooch from
Vicki (Kim Bassinger) Vale.
Not one to kiss and tell,
Robert Wuhl, who starred as
investigative reporter Alex-
ander Knox in 1989's
number-one box office smash
Batman, will take on an-
other beat.
This time his assignment
is in Royal Oak's Daily
Tribune building where he'll
be performing — not repor-
ting — at Mark Ridley's new
castle of comedy.
Wuhl (pronounced "wall")
will be in town March 1-3.
Although he's no stranger to
Mark Ridley's Comedy
Castle, he'll be making his
first visit to Ridley's new
home in Royal Oak.
The son of a wholesale
fruit salesman, Wuhl grew
up in Union, N.J. His dream
was to someday be in the
entertainment business. The
young Wuhl often went to
the movies. However, it
wasn't the people in front of
the camera he was in awe
over. He idolized the talents
behind the scenes.
"I always wanted to start
writing and producing films,
using Woody Allen as a role
model," Wuhl said. "My
heroes were people like Billy
- Wilder, Stanley Kramer,
Neil Simon and Allen."
As a student at the Uni-
versity of Houston, he
studied acting, worked the
dinner theater circuit and
composed the music for the
First Annual Shakespeare
Festival. "I loved college,"
he said. "I crammed four
years into seven."
After being exposed to
Shakespeare, who earned
much respect for his plays,
Wuhl returned east and in
1976 wrote for a comedian
who didn't get any respect —
Rodney Dangerfield.
Not only did Dangerfield
start getting some r-e-s-p-e-c-
t, Wuhl's work did too. And
by the mid-1980s all was
well with Wuhl.
He received a feature role,
playing Robin Williams'
fellow deejay, Marty
Dreiwitz, in Good Morning
Viet Nam. He then went to
bat for the baseball movie
Bull Durham, playing the
fast-talking pitching coach
and resident cheerleader of
Kevin Costner's minor
league baseball team. "I love

Robert Wuhl:
actor, comedian and writer.

baseball," he said. "I just
adore the game."
Both films were a hit. And
moviegoers had only seen
the beginning of Wuhl, the .
actor. His role in Batman
was one of the few created
especially for the movie.
"It was a great gig," Wuhl
said of working with
Michael Keaton, Jack
Nicholson and Bassinger in
the film. Fortunately for
Wuhl, in the movie, only one
joker was killed —
Nicholson.
"I was supposed to be
killed, but they kept me

Not only did
Dangerfield start
getting some
r-e-s-p-e-c-t, WuhPs
work did too. And
by the mid-1980s
all was well with
Wuhl.

alive. I would love to do a se-
quel," the comedian said.
Although Batman has
since left the silver screen,
Wuhl hasn't. He's now ap-
pearing with Paul Newman
in Blaze.
"It's basically a cameo
part," he said. "I play a
sleaze-bag club owner."
Off screen, Wuhl keeps
busy writing. For the past
three years he has written
for the Grammy Awards,
penning special material for
Billy Crystal, a close friend
of his.
Wuhl admitted that some-
day he'd like to do some
more theater work. Will he
star as the next Phantom of
the Opera? Ahhh, no.
He admitted, "I respect
Andrew Lloyd Webber, but
I'm not a big fan."

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