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February 23, 1990 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I FITNESS

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58

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1990

SOUTHFIELD

559-3580

Tip A Day

Medical Association En-
cyclopedia and Poor Richard's
Almanac."
"There are a lot of health
myths floating around out
there," according to Powell,
"and if the goal is to get peo-
ple to rely more on them-
selves, then we have to pro-
vide them with the tools to
determine what's factual and
what's fictional."
Because his training as a
psychologist doesn't qualify
him as an expert on many of
the problems and solutions
covered in Hints the book's
index runs the gamut from
AIDS to zinc deficiency —
Powell consulted a cadre of ex-
perts, including leading
physicians, professors,
medical researchers, cor-
porate health personnel and
even public safety officials in
metropolitan Detroit and
across the country. The staffs
at Sinai and William Beau-
mont hospitals and the
University of Michigan and
Wayne State University
medical schools are well-
represented throughout.
The book also contains an
appendix listing about four
dozen toll-free telephone
numbers for additional infor-
mation on a variety of health-
related topics. "Hotline to
health," the guide is called.
"I planned on those (heavy
outside contributions) going
in," Powell said. "My ex-
perience is in health
psychology; I'm not a medical
doctor."
"What I thought I could do
was communicate the
assembled information to the
lay person in a way it could
easily be understood."
Powell said writing the
book was an educational ex-
perience for him, too. One of
the things he said he
discovered was that, in
writing chapters on women's
and men's health problems,
the female chapter ended up
being twice as long. "I ex-
pected that because, frankly,
there don't seem to be as
many health issues unique to
men as there are to women,"
Powell said.
"But what I came to realize
was that men have somewhat
neglected their problems. I
guess it's that macho kind of
thing."
Powell said what sets Hints
apart from the myriad of self-
help books on store shelves
these days is that the volume
is "prevention-oriented, as op-
posed to treatment-oriented."
That, he said, is partly the
result of his philosophy and
the work he has done at the
Institute for Preventive
Medicine since founding it in
1983. The institute has
developed health promotional



programs for hundreds of
coprorations, including
hospitals throughout the
United States and Canada.
Local clients have included
General Motors, Ford and
Michigan National Bank,
plus Sinai, Beaumont, Pro-
vidence and Botsford hospi-
tals, according to Powell.
The preventive medicine, or
wellness, concept has been
gaining gradual acceptance
from corporate America for
the last several years, Powell
said, almost in tandem with
rising medical insurance
costs. "It's a fact of life that
those expenses are going up
and one way to keep them in
check is by promoting better
everyday health."
And Powell believes strong-
ly that mental, emotional and

Two chapters deal
directly with the
brain's role in
promoting and
alleviating physical
symptoms.

physical health are bound
together in the wellness
package. He cited a growing
number of studies which call
attention to psycho-neuro im-
munology, or "the mind-body
connection on our ability to
fight disease."
"There's good research that
shows that the mind plays a
role in how a person deals
with cancer, heart disease
and even the common cold,"
he said.

Two chapters in Hints,
Over Stress" and
"Your Emotions and Your
Health," deal directly with
the brain's role in promoting
and alleviating physical
symptoms.
American Jews, meanwhile,
may have been among the
first groups to jump on the
wellness bandwagon, Powell
said, because the Jewish com-
munity has always strived to
better itself, both physically
and intellectually. Powell said
the people he encounters at
the Jewish Community
Center, of which he is a
member, typify this "be the
best you can be" philosophy.
"That is also I think why
Jews have been at the
forefront in research to pre-
vent heart disease and on
other health issues," the
psychologist said.
Powell is a native New
Yorker who chose to remain
in Michigan after his student
years in Ann Arbor because
"I just couldn't leave." His
bachelor's, master's and doc-
torate degrees all were earn-
ed at U-M

"Success

.

"Besides, I met my wife
here," he said. Nancy teaches
first grade at Hillel Day
School.
In addition to Brett, the
Powells have another son,
Jordan, 8. The family recent-
ly joined Congregation Shir
Shalom in West Bloomfield.
A former jogger done in by
a bad back, Powell said he
likes to walk for exercise and
also enjoys spectator sports. ❑

I SPORTS I

B'nai B'rith
Basketball Results

Brotherhood 4, guided by
player-coach Larry Schon,
boosted its season record to
2-1 with a 37-27 victory Sun-
day over Zager Stone in B'nai
B'rith Men's "C" League
competition at Oakland Corn-
munity College in Farm-
ington Hills.
The two wins are the team's
first in their last 23 games.
The team was 0-10 each of the
last two seasons.

February 11, 1990
"A" League

Downtown Fox 1
Detroit 1
Detroit 2
Pisgah 3
Brotherhood 2
Pisgah 2
"B" League

Pisgah 1
Keiden 2
Brotherhood 5
Tikvah
Downtown Fox 2
Brotherhood/Bloch
"C"League
East

Brotherhood 6
Brotherhood 4
Zager Stone
Morganthau 3

W
3
3
1
1
1
0

L
0
0
2
2
2
3

W
3
2
1
1
1
1

L
0
1
2
2
2
2

W
2
2
1
1

L
1
1
2
2

West

W
L
Downtown Fox 3
3
0
Morganthau 2
2
1
Detroit 3
1
2
Centennial
0
3
Brotherhood 2 — 2, 0, forfeit;
Downtown Fox 1 — 54, Pisgah 3 —
48; Detroit 1 — 49, Pisgah 2 — 48;
Brotherhood/
Bloch — 69, Keiden 2 — 44;
Downtown Fox 2 — 48, Tikvah —
42; Pisgah 1 — 53, Brotherhood 5
— 48; Morganthau 3 — 50,
Brotherhood 6 — 44; Brotherhood
4 — 37, Zager Stone — 27;
Downtown Fox 3 — 47, Morgenthau
— 41; Detroit 3 — 35, Centennial —
32.

Jewish War Vets'
Bowling Results-

February 14, 1990
High Games
Michael Gersten
232
Steve Hoberman
232-214
Herbert Bogorad
226
Marc Siegler
222
Michael Byer
213
David Margolis
213

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