100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

February 23, 1990 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I LIFE IN ISRAEL

New
Arrivals

European crafted cribs
and furniture plus
unique bedding and
accessories provide the
ideal background for
that Very Important
Baby. Bellini also offers
youth furniture that
grows with your child.

cEs I_ IN/

Mark, Elana and Luaria Puzis and their Lada in Israel.

1875 S. WOODWARD • BIRMINGHAM 48011
1 Block North of 14 Mile
644-0525

Exercis e
regularly.

WERE FIGHTING FOR
YOUR LIFE

American Heart t ip
Association

THE FINEST IN HOME SECURITY

Panasonic

6453 FARMINGTON ROAD
W. BLOOMFIELD

SYSTEM

855-5822

$495 00

A

IC
Office Automation CA1

MAPLE (at CRANBROOK)
BIRMINGHAM

and up

433-3070

/ ‘‘

. ,

.
7/ 757.,W=7-

KX-P1124 $309

100

$M4i...1..il

Li 1..1

/

i



1 I

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1990

THAT
PERSONALIZED
TOUCH

.f., ,, PE,

25.00

SY DRAFT, INC.

44

Unique Gifts For All Ages

titAidth

SOFTWARE ALWAYS DISCOUNTED 30%

LINCOL N CENTER
26130 Greenf ield, Oak Park

WE SHIP
FURNITURE
cj Glue
k-rnA
*I

968-2620



Customized Imprinting
Always 20% OFF!




Napkins, Guest Towels, Place Cards
Cake Boxes and Matches.

fl5 Bev and Sue 661-0177

FO;
• Invitations For All Occasions •

Soviet Couple Drives
To Israel To Win Bet

Haifa — Officials here
were confounded recently
when a Soviet couple and
their 5-month-old daughter
showed up at this Mediter-
ranean port city in their
Soviet-built Lada.
They had reached Israel by
ferry from Greece, thanks to
the Swedish embassy in
Bulgaria, which acted in the
behalf of Israel.
It seems the couple had
started out 10 days earlier
from the Black Sea port of
Odessa in the Soviet Union
on a bet, the booty being a
case of vodka. En route, 25-
year-old Mark Puzis and his
wife, Elana, 22, had to sell
their jewelry and the vodka
to buy food for themselves
and daughter Luaria.
The trio reached Bulgaria,
where they applied for a visa
to Greece, but found them-

selves in a Catch-22 situa-
tion: the USSR rescinds
citizenship for anyone leav-
ing the country and the
Greek consulate would not
issue a visa with the family's
inadequate paperwork.
The Swedish embassy ob-
tained the visas and the
family finally reached Haifa
via ferry from the port of
Piraeus.
Their troubles weren't
over, however. Israeli im-
migration officials told the
Puns they'd have to go to
Jerusalem because the bu-
reau had no absorption
agency in Haifa.
Today, Puzis and his fami-
ly live in Be'ersheva, with
friends from the USSR. He
works part-time as a
mechanic and sings at a
Russian restaurant on Fri-
day nights.

Romanian Jews Worry
About Future

Jerusalem (JTA) — The
Jews of Romania are seri-
ously concerned for their
future, despite assurances
by officials that the new
government will continue to
guarantee their well-being.
The assurances were given
to Sylvia Hassenfeld, presi-
dent of the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Com-
mittee, and Michael
Schneider, its executive di-
rector, who visited Romania
and Czechoslovakia.
Romanian Jews, who had a
stable if precarious existence
under the late dictator
Nicolae Ceausescu, are fear-
ful of the emergence of fas-
cist elements in the tur-
bulent atmosphere that has
prevailed since the revo-

lution two months ago, the
JDC officials reported.
"Anti-Semitic slogans
such as 'Jews go!' can al-
ready be seen on the walls."
Hassenfeld and Schneider
met with Romania's new
president, Ion Illisscu, and
other senior officials in
Bucharest.
"Illiescu said Jews were
free to emigrate, to stay or to
come back, as they wish,"
Schneider reported.
There are at most 22,000
Jews in Romania. Before the
revolution, 1,200 to 1,400
immigrated to Israel each
year.
But unless the situation
worsens appreciably, no
mass aliyah should be ex-
pected from that country.

(

,c-z(

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan