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February 16, 1990 - Image 78

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I TRAVEL

For as little as $16/day (plus
airfare) on an EL AL Milk &
Honey Vacation, we'll take
care of your hotel.
We'll take care of your
Israeli breakfasts.
We'll take care of your
car rental.
With another package,
we'll take care of your tour
of Jerusalem.
We'll take care of your
journey to Tiberias.
We'll take care of your
excursion to Tel Aviv.
We'll take care of your
visit to a kibbutz.
But before you leave home,
keep one thing in mind.
There are some things
you'll have to find someone
else to take care of.

Palm Beach Hosts
Luxury, Charity

SUSAN SMALL

p

Special to The Jewish News

To find out more about all our Milk & Honey Vacations,
see your travel agent or call 1-800-EL AL SUN.

For a free Milk & Honey Vacations brochure, write: EL AL
Israel Airlines, P.O. Box 9031, East Setauket, NY 11733.

Name

Address

City

Zip

State

/

.

EL"„„

Amur

"//,, ■ Ew

The Airline of Israel.

516/day available from 4/23/90-11/11/90 (excluding 6/22/90-7/8/90 and_10/1/90-10114/90). Based on per person double occupancy.
14 day advance purchase required. Hotel for 5 nights/6 days. Car rental does not include gas, mileage and insurance. Other restrictions may apply.

Sid & Eleanor Wais

Formerly of Stone Travel

are happy to announce
the opening of
their own Travel Agency!

SID'S TRAVEL

SIMIBIBIW%

"P"' 41111

"I

11.11111011111.1.1111111.110111111111111=11111111111111L NWINW

"Call Us For All Your Travel Needs"
17117 W. NINE MILE ROAD, SUITE 121 • SOUTHFIELD, MI 48075
(313) 569-7575 1-800-837-0888

HAMILTON, MILLER, HUDSON & FAYNE
TRAVEL CORPORATION BRINGS YOU

NEWBERRY SQUARE
CRUISES & TRAVEL

39530 14 Mlle Rd.
Corner of Haggerty

R AV

(313) 669.6760

CALL

78

DETROIT'S
BEST PRICES!
313-827-4070

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1990

BAY POINTE
TRAVEL

4088 Haggerty Rd.
Corner of Richardson

, (313) 360.4100

E

L

aim Beach has long
been a symbol of
luxury living and a
magnet for the wealthy from
around the world. Far less
publicized is the town's role as
a venue for charity functions.
Looking at a list of local ac-
tivities one is not struck so
much by the busy social
calendar of Palm Beach
residents as by the number of
international charities which
hold fund raising events in
this town of just over 10,000
people.
Situated on Florida's Gold
Coast, the town dates back
only to the 1890s, when
Henry Flagler, the railroad
tycoon, began to develop the
area. He named the town
after the coconut palms com-
mon to that locale and per-
sonally directed the layout of
what is today Palm Beach.
A fashionable resort town,
with a quiet charm and
tropical beauty, Palm Beach
is famous for its Mediterra-
nean mansions, which line
Ocean Blvd., and for the ex-
clusive shops which line its
well-known Worth Avenue.
Thanks to the beautiful
mansions on Ocean Blvd. the
drive along the coast of Palm
Beach provides one of the
most scenic routes in south
Florida. This route continues
from Palm Beach down to
Fort Lauderdale.
The major tourist attraction
in Palm Beach is the Henry
Morrison Flagler Museum,
which is located in the
Whitehall Mansion, the
former home of Henry
Flagler.
The mansion, which is fur-
nished with original and
period pieces, cost $4 million
to build in 1902. Located on
the property today also is the
luxurious private railroad car
in which Henry Flagler
traveled. Guided tours are
conducted Tuesday through
Sunday.
Of special note in Palm
Beach are two other
museums. The Hibel
Museum of Art features the
works of Edna Hibel, one of
the youngest living artists
who is already represented in
a major American museum.
Hibel was born in 1917, but
one of her paintings is part of
the permanent collection of
the Boston Museum of fine
Arts.
The Hibel museum's collec-
tion is made up of paintings,
lithographs and porcelain ob-

jects. Among the latter are
limited edition plates, produc-
ed by Rosenthal.
Also in Palm Beach is the
Society of the Four Arts.
Located in the Four Arts
Plaza, the complex houses an
art museum and library,
along with sculpture and
botanical gardens.
Two of the above museums
schedule regular public
gatherings on their premises.
The Hibel Museum hosts con-
certs (at 3 p.m.) on the second
Sunday of each month, from
November through May.
The Flagler Museum has
much more extensive public
use. Throughout the year, this
mansion serves as a setting
for cultural and social
programs.

The most famous site for
the town's many social and
charity functions is the world
renowned five-star Breakers
Hotel of Palm Beach. Noted
for its architecture and
beautiful grounds, the
Breakers is spread out over
an area of 140 acres and
along one half mile of beach.
The epitome of Palm Beach
luxury, this hostelery is also
one of the busiest settings in
south Florida for the staging
of charity functions.
Although there has been a
tradition of elegant charity
balls at the Breakers from the
time its doors were opened to
the public, this tradition has
expanded in recent years.
Whereas originally there
were three gala events held
each 'season,' today the
Breakers is a place where
charity functions seem to oc-
cur on an almost daily basis,
drawing society and interna-
tional figures from around
the world. A look at the chari-
ty functions held at the
Breakers by the Jewish com-
munity alone, over only a
period of about a month, con-
veys just a glimpse of the
numerous events continually
running at this "Palace by
the Sea."
During the last week of
January, the American
Jewish Committee's annual
luncheon at the Breakers was
the occasion for honoring this
year's National Human Rela-
tions Award recipient. That
same week the Breakers
hosted the annual Mother to
Another luncheon of the Palm
Beach Chapter of Women's
American ORT, and a 31st an-
nual reception, which was
sponsored by the Jewish
Theological Seminary.
In the early part of
February the Breakers

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