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February 16, 1990 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I BUSINESS

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and see the
health club G
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with women
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Camp
Continued from preceding page



enesis Women's Fitness
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Take advantage of our generous
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initiation fee.

Don't miss this opportunity to
get acquainted with the health
club designed with you in
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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1990

Representatives from about
50 camps and travel - pro-
grams, including local day
camps, national and Cana-
dian residential camps, study
camps and specialty camps,
were at the fair to help
campers, parents and young
people looking for employ-
ment as camp counsellors.
"It gave people a chance to
see their options," Sturman
says. "Summer programs are
essential for most children to-
day and there is so much out
there, so many choices, that
they don't have to choose
something that's not right for
them." O

Town Hall's Swastikas
On Floor Stir Furor

27877 Orchard Lake Rd., in the Orchard 12 Plaza ♦ (313) 489-1811

60

that we thought people would
be very pleased to find out
about."

I NEWS 1

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• SPECIALISTS IN
CUSTOM
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Palmer Institute in Detroit,
which recently hosted "Super
Summer for Kids — A Camp
and Activities Fair."
The fair was the first of its
kind in the Detroit area and
a new venture for the In-
stitute, according to Special
Projects Coordinator Elaine
Sturman.
The Institute, which was
founded in 1920 and is part of
Wayne State University, is a
non-profit organization which
helps families and the com-
munities in which they live.
"One problem facing
families today is the need for
summer programs," Sturman
says. "With so many women
in the work force, summer can
be a difficult time. There are
so many wonderful programs

New York (JTA) — Mosaic
tiles, inlaid in the form of a
swastika on the floors of the
Hull, Mass., town hall have
brought protests, media at-
tention and prolonged town
meetings to the small,
heretofore tranquil New
England town.
At a meeting of the Hull
town selectmen Jan. 17, a
resolution was passed im-
mediately to cover with
carpeting the 150 swastikas
that are dispersed
throughout the building.
It was also resolved that
Town Manager Joseph Mur-
phy be given one month to
come up with an alternate
plan to totally remove the
offending symbols.
"This is a major victory,"
said Michael Slomich, New
England director of the Jew-
ish Defense League, who
mounted the protest move-
ment against the swastikas.
"It was a tough fight, but we
won. Everyone seems reliev-
ed."
But resolution or no
resolution, people in Hull
are fed up with the whole
issue. "Please, just leave us
alone," said Jim Linville,
one of the five town select-
men. "We promise we'll get
rid of the swastikas; now
please leave us alone."
Hull, a small working-
class town 28 miles south of
Boston, is the home of the
oldest lighthouse in the
United States and one of the
most beautiful beaches in
the Northeast.
Now it is known as the
home of the "swastika
building," and many Hull
residents fear that they may

be considered anti-Semitic or
pro-Nazi simply because of
the media coverage the town
has received in recent
weeks.
"The people of my town
are not a bunch of bigots,"
said Linville. "This should
never have been an issue.
The swastikas should never
have been there to begin
with. The whole thing is a
big mistake."
The brouhaha began three
weeks ago, when a protest
march of about 30 persons,
organized by the Jewish
Defense League, wound its
way through Hull's streets
to the municipal building
and demanded that the town
council remove the symbols
of National Socialism and
anti-Semitism.
"I saw the swastikas and I
couldn't believe it," said
Slomich, a few days after the
protest march. "They're at
every entrance. It's as if the
Nazis won the war. We want
this floor to be torn up,
painted over, whatever -- but
these symbols must be
obliterated."
In response, the Hull
selectmen met Jan. 11 and
decided to take immediate
action to remedy the situa-
tion.
"The issue has been
brought up a number of
times in past years," said re-
cently appointed Town
Manager Joseph Murphy.
"But there obviously was a
disinclination to do
anything."
Town officials have avoid-
ed confronting the issue in
the past, contending that the
swastikas are ancient Indian

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