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February 16, 1990 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIDE WASHINGTON

Our Home Equity
Loan Is First Rate

PR MAX. LOAN
CURRENT A
Anc
TO VALUE

Franklin Savings

11.75%

80%

National Bank of Detroit

12.00%

75%

ivlanufacturers

12.50%

75% +

Standard Federal

12.00%

75%

Comerica

12.50%

75%

Michigan National Bank

12.00%

75%

Jewish Groups Continue Efforts
To Bolster HUD For Elderly

JAMES D.BESSER

Washington Correspondent

LOWEST RATE & HIGHEST LOAN LIMIT

The chart says it all. Even the largest financial institutions
in Metro Detroit don't offer the LOWEST RATE and
the HIGHEST LOAN LIMIT like Franklin Savings Bank.

PLUS ... There are NO ANNUAL FEES or closing costs

that can cost 100's of dollars at other banks.

*Applications now being accepted for our variable rate
home equity plan adjusted monthly according to prime
+1.75% to a maximum Annual Percentage Rate of 18.0%
effective 1/30/90.

ewish activists con-
tinue their behind-the-
scenes work to bolster
an important program that
provides funding for the con-
struction of low-income
housing for the elderly.
During last fall's
legislative wars, Jewish
Federation groups and B'nai
B'rith International fought
for language on the Housing
and Urban Development ap-
propriations bill that would
make more money available
for Section 202 housing —
and for changes in HUD
regulations to make it easier

j

to build low-income housing
for the elderly.
These efforts produced a
general commitment by
HUD officials to facilitate
new low-income elderly
housing — but few specific
changes in the process of
allocating funds.
Specifically, Jewish groups
need a updating of HUD
guidelines dating back 25
years.
"The program is based on
building costs from the
1960s," said Susan Banes
Harris, Washington repre-
sentative for the New York
federations. "Things like
mortgage ceilings and fair-
market rents haven't been

increased since then. So it's
very difficult for groups that
want to put together attrac-
tive housing packages to do
so."
In New York, Jewish
groups have tried to locate
new housing for the elderly
adjacent to Jewish commun-
ity centers, with connecting
structures — something that
HUD has rejected.

Complicating matters fur-
ther is the fact that the cur-
rent administration budget
proposal includes a 45 per-
cent decrease for Section 202
housing, which could put a
severe crimp in Jewish hous-
ing programs for the elderly
in a number of cities.

Late Change, Dole
Helped Pass Hate Bill

+Other offers may apply based on first mortgage relationship.

CALL (313) 358-5170

Franklin
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SAVINGS

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FDIC - Insured

LOOM

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Eyewear

DOC

• •

OF WEST BLOOMFIELD

Dr. Howard J. Rosner, Optometrist
West Bloomfield Plaza • Orchard Lake south of Maple • 626-0200

THE BEST CARPET DESERVES
THE BEST CARE

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by
Maryann

425 4800

-

Our foam extraction rated best by independent tests.

Residential and commercial experts in carpet, furniture, drapery, and blind cleaning.

BOB & MARYANN ZUKOSKY

28

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1990

Last week's Senate
passage of the Hate Crimes
Statistics bill was the result
of sophisticated lobbying by
a coalition including several
major Jewish groups.
And, curiously, the hate
crimes coalition may have
benefited indirectly from
the controversy over propos-
ed cuts in Israel's foreign aid
allocation.
The bill, which mandates
the collection of statistics on
crimes based on the victims'
race, religion, ethnicity or
sexual orientation, had been
shot down in past sessions by
Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.),
who objected to the inclusion
of statistics on crimes
against homosexuals.
In recent months, Jewish
groups worked to enlist
enough Senate co-sponsors
to inoculate the bill against
crippling amendments by
the North Carolina conser-
vative. Also, a protective
amendment had been
crafted by Sen. Orrin Hatch
(R-Utah) and Sen. Paul
Simon (D-Ill.), stating that
the bill did not condone
homosexuality.
But on Wednesday, it ap-
peared that the Hatch-
Simon amendment would
not be enough to provide
"cover" for Republican sena-
tors, who were under intense
pressure to support a com-
peting Helms proposal. As a
result, the hate- crimes co-
alition made a tactical deci-
sion to add additional lang-
uage to the amendment in
an effort to keep Repub-
licans in line.

Jesse Helms:
Loses war.

The added language
stressed the importance of
"American family life ," a

semantic high-wire act in-
tended to avoid the phrase
"traditional family
values"—the rallying cry of
some anti-homosexual
forces.
The Hatch-Simon
modification was accepted,
and the crippling Helms
amendment went down to a
crushing 77-19 defeat
Another factor in the
passage of the bill was Sen.
Robert Dole (R-Kans.), who
served as a broker in the
passage of the Hatch-Simon
language. Some Jewish ac-
tivists privately speculated
that Dole's last-minute sup-
port for the bill may have
been related to his con-
troversial proposals for cut-
ting foreign aid to Israel.

Activist To Teach
Politics In E. Europe

American political ac-
tivists are flocking to East-
ern Europe to help with the
democratic revolution
sweeping the continent. One
of the latest is Jennifer
Kessler, who organized one
of the largest Jewish vol-
unteer social action projects
in the country at the Jewish
Community Center in Wash-
ington.
Kessler, who now works as
director of political edu-
cation for Campaigns and
Elections, a magazine for
professional politicos, will
lead a group of 25 political
consultants to Poland,

Czechoslovakia and
Hungary in March.
"The training program has
two tracks," Kessler said.
"The first is on how to win a
political campaign. They
have no experience; they
don't know how to define
their priorities, or even what
their priorities are. The se-
cond track involves the basic
values of democracy — ideas
like the separation of church
and state, the media as a
watchdog, the rights of
minorities."

Kessler expressed special
concern about signs of grow-

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