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February 09, 1990 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I CAPITOL REPORT

JEWELRY AUCTION

One of the Detroit Area's Finest Jewelers has released over 340
pieces of fine 14KT & 18KT Man's & Lady's Modern & Estate
Jewelry to be liquidated at Public Auction to the highest bidder.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11th —1 P.M.

Removed for convenience of sale to:

MATSEL'S GALLERIES

815 Woodward Ave., Pontiac (1 mile N. of Sq. Lake Rd.)

WOLF BLITZER

FEATURING: Pearl & Emerald Necklace, 18KT Jules Jurgeson Man's Wrist
Watch, Garnet Necklace, Lavender Jade pendant, Natural Colored Diamond &
Baguette Ring, Emerald & Diamond Ring, Emerald & Diamond Pendant, Sap-
phire, Pearl & Diamond Ring, Diamond Necklace, Ruby & Diamond Ring, Carved
Opal & Diamond Pendant/Brooch, Enamel & Diamond Ring, Sapphire & Diamond
Bracelet, Bag lots of gold charms, Fraternal & Judaic Jewelry all in 14KT & 18KT
Gold, Old Shoe Buckles, Lots of ivory and hardstone necklaces, S/S Brushes,
Mirrors, Bag lots of Costume Jewelry, etc. TOO MANY TO LIST.
EXHIBITION: Fri., Feb. 9 & Sat., Feb. 10 — 10 A.M.-5 P.M.
TERMS: Cash, Check, American Express, MasterCard, Visa, Discover
ABSENTEE BIDS ACCEPTED
(10% Buyers Premium)
THE AUCTION IS A ONCE IN A LIFETIME CHANCE TO ACQUIRE FINE JEWELRY
FOR YOUR VALENTINE AT OR BELOW WHOLESALE. DEALERS MUST PROVIDE
RESALE CERTIFICATE.

Matsel's Galleries, Inc

.

815 Woodward Ave. • Pontiac, Mi. 48053 • (313) 338-9040

REV LUTI NARY

Now two hands can do the
functions of what in the past
had required at least six. Just
choose a function: Alarm, stop-
watch, timer, time of day and
the computer-driven hands move

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automatically to

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GIFT
BASKETS &
TRAYS
Cf
FOR ALL c
cOCCASIONS

(313) 626-9050

,, —

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T:',::%

.., .,.. .
that's Seiko I.O. —Intelligent
.ie
Quartz. This Ultimate Alarm
, ,
Chronograph has a gilt and
cream dial strapped with a rich
brown, padded calf leather. As
always, a combination of style
and technology.

• Personalized & Theme Baskets (
• Gourmet Food & Gift Items
c

CORPORATE GIFTS

.:.

LOCAL & NATIONWIDE DELIVERY

I

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SEIKO

THE FUTURE OF TIME IS IN OUR HANDS.

Call or Visit Our Showroom

„...„
.1

29594 Orchard Lake Rd.
Farmington Hills, MI

•KOSHER & DIET RESTRICTED AVAILABLE

....,„,

MB JEWELRY DESIGN & MFG. LTD.

MORRIS BEDNARSH / ANTHONY FERRARI

30

Applegate Square
29847 Northwestern Hwy.
Southfield, Michigan 48034

We are winning.

356-7007

SOCIETY
CANCER'

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1990

AMERICAN

New Survivors' Registry
Faces Shortage Of Time

Washington Correspondent

T

he citation noted that
David Blitzer was
born in the Polish
town of Oswiecim, which the
Germans later called
Auschwitz. During the war,
he was incarcerated at Bis-
ingen, Buchenwald, Funf-
teichen, Gross Rosen, and
Markstadt. There is a refer-
ence to Cesia Blitzer, his
wife.
But I, their son, could not
help but notice that there
was no mention of her place
of birth or the names of the
forced labor camps where
she had been sent during the
war. She had apparently not
filled out the required ques-
tionnaire even though she,
too, had attended the Ameri-
can Gathering of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors in
Washington in 1983.
An uncle, Samuel Fried-
man of Buffalo, New York,
was cited. Place of birth:
Lwow, Poland. During the
war, he survived Auschwitz,
Flossenberg and Monowice.
His late wife (my Aunt
Paula) was also included.
Place of birth: a small town
in Poland called Suched-
niow.
But there was no mention
of other uncles and aunts in
Highland Park, Illinois;
Ocean Township, New
Jersey; and Williamsville,
New York.
Now they, and perhaps as
many as 35,000 other Holo-
caust survivors still alive in
the United States and
Canada who also have not
filled out the form, will have
another chance to become
part of a remarkable book:
the National Registry of Jew-
ish Holocaust Survivors.
The first volume, a thick
and heavy book with a sim-
ple gray cover, has just been
released. Benjamin Meed,
the devoted President of the
American Gather-
ing/Federation of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors, has
been the driving force
behind the project. He has
spent the last several years
of his life collecting the
names. The first edition in-
cludes 28,000 of the already
collected 65,000 names of
survivors living in the
United States and Canada.
Volunteers are currently
processing these other files.
But as Meed underscored
during an interview here the
other day, there is an urgen-

cy in collecting the remain-
ing names as quickly as
possible. Half of the sur-
vivors alive today will prob-
ably be dead within the next
10 years. They already are
in the 60s, 70s and 80s. Time
is running out for these
eyewitnesses who can per-
sonally testify about the
horrors of the Holocaust.
"The clock stops for
nobody," he said. "We are
getting older, time advances
much more quickly than we
would like, and so much still
remains to be done. Our task
of securing our legacy is now
more essential than ever
before."
Meed, a warm and intense
man who came to America
after the war with only $8 in

"We were equal
during the
Holocaust — and
we should be
equally
remembered after
we're gone," Meed
said.

his pocket, spoke movingly
about his mission. In the
Jewish community, he wears
many hats but, as he likes to
say, "all are made of the
same fabric."
Among other things, he is
Chairman of the Content
Committee of the United
State Holocaust Memorial
Council, which is building a
museum on the Mall in
Washington, D.C. It is
scheduled to be opened in
1993. He is also Chairman of
the Council's Days of Re-
membrance Committee.

Unless the Registry is
complete, he warned, the
process of "sanitizing"the
Holocaust will continue and,
in 20 years, so-called experts
will question whether it
really ever happened.
"They will say it wasn't so
terrible," Meed pointed out.
"They will say that others
also suffered. They will say
it wasn't exclusive to Jews.
It happened to other people
as well." He called this pro-
cess, already under way, the
"universalization" of the
Holocaust.
"But our destruction is not
the same," he continued. "It
was very different. We were
chosen simply because we
were born Jews. We could
have been practicing
Catholics, but if the Nazis
found out we were born

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