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February 09, 1990 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIDE WASHINGTON

r"'

DETROIT'S
HIGHEST
RATES

Minimum Deposit of $500
12 MONTH CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT

8.00%
8.243%

Effective Annual Yield*

Compounded Quarterly.

This is a fixed rate account that is insured
to $100,000 by the Savings Association In-
surance Fund (SAIF). Substantial Interest
Penalty for early withdrawal from cer-
tificate accounts. Rates subject to
change without notice.

FIRST
SECURITI71
SAVINGS
BANK

FSB

PHONE 338E7700
352.7700

MAIN OFFICE

1760 Telegraph Rd.

(Just South of Orchard lake)

.0 4,1(*** **

** as
Deposit.
Federally Insured
to S100,000

Is**

eF

*

B,KA

titt

.n.ra

MOUSING
I Ot.
OPPORTUNITYY

28

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1990

-Crick

eh

* *

HOURS:
MON.-THURS.
9:30-4:30
FRI.
9:30-6:00

Artwork by Barbara Cummings. Copyright° 1990, Barbara Cummings. Distributed by Los Angeles Times Syndicate.

Split Between Jewish Groups
Threatens Major Civil Rights Bill

JAMES D. BESSER

Washington Correspondent

A

major split among
Jewish groups
threatens the solid
coalition which hopes to
push through a major civil
rights package in the cur-
rent session of Congress.
The bitter debate involves
efforts by the American Jew-
ish Congress to add
"religious accommodation"
language to the civil rights
bill. The added language
would make it easier for
workers — including
Sabbath-observing Jews —
t o work out
"accommodations" with
their employers if their re-
ligion forbids them from
working on certain days.
But the Leadership Con-
ference on Civil Rights, the
key organization in the de-
velopment of the bill, has re-
jected any changes to the
draft legislation, which is
slated for introduction this
week.
And many Jewish activists
who have worked with the
Conference on the bill agree
that the attempt to modify
the measure could hurt its
chances for passage, and ag-
gravate black-Jewish rela-
tions.
"Over time, we reached
the consensus that on this
bill, we would pursue a
narrow focus, and address
these other issues on a
separate track," said one of-
ficial with the Leadership
Conference. "Otherwise it
would become un-

manageable."
The bill, this source said,
was tightly focused to ad-
dress a series of Supreme
Court decisions last year
which limited the ability of
employees to prove discrim-
ination by employers. In the
process, the group rejected
pleas from a number of
minorities for additional
protections.
Among the Jewish groups,
the matter came to a head at
a recent meeting in New
York at which the AJ Con-
gress suggested the addi-
tional language. In the
heated debate, the group
accused other Jewish organ-
izations of being insuffi-
ciently concerned with pro-
tecting the civil rights of
Jews; activists for the other
groups accused the AJ Con-
gress of throwing a monkey
wrench into a carefully-
crafted coalition.
The American Jewish
Committee took the lead in
pressing for a separate re-
ligious accommodations bill.
"I consider it a waste of time
getting into intergroup
squabbles over who is doing
the best job of protecting the

Jews," said Judy Golub, the
group's assistant Washing-
ton representative.
The American Jewish
Congress sees things diff-
erently. "The notion that all
these other things are not
controversial and that the
religious accommodations
language is, that it will
somehow sink the bill, is so
palpably false that it simply
must be a cover for
something else," said Marc
Stern, co-director of the
American Jewish Congress'
Commission on Law and So-
cial Action and the chief
promoter of the additional
language. "So we have the
spectacle of Jewish groups
going to the Leadership Con-
ference and saying, 'don't
put our issue on the agen-
da.'"
The other Jewish groups,
Stern argued, opposed the
provisions simply because
they felt such additions
would be "offensive" to the
civil rights coalition.
Currently, one religious
accommodations measure is
in the draft stage, sponsored
by Rep. Stephen Solarz,
D-N.Y.

Activists Push Passage
Of 'Motor-Voter' Bill

Jewish activists got
together last week for a big
push on the Universal Voter
Registration bill, legislation
which could add millions of
new voters to the rolls by
making it easier to register.
Currently, each state has

different mechanisms for
voter registration, even for
federal elections. In some
states, prospective voters are
required to register in per-
son, during business hours —
an obvious inconvenience for
working people.

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