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February 09, 1990 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I CLOSE-UP

Thanks

Tough Cookies

Continued from preceding page

To Our Wonderful
Friends And Family
Members for Their
Kindness And Support
During This Difficult
Time In Our Lives.
The Kosins Family

Learn how to take
better care of yourself
and your family,
call Red Cross.

American
Red Cross

I, A Public Service of This Newspaper
& The Advertising Council

prI

CONTEMPORARY

• furniture
• lighting
• wall decor
• gifts
• silk florals
• interiors

833-4440

Well Help.
Will You?

Portrait of
the Great
American
Investor

W inter Sale. Receive an addi-

tional 5% off our entire inventory
already at 20-50% OFF!

casual
living
modes

For the best in contemporary home furnishings
and accessories for over 36 years!

5441711 • 22961 WOODWARD • FERNDALE

26

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1990

It's his job to know good
advertising—and he also
knows a good investment.
Terry Wilson puts his money
in U.S. Savings Bonds.
Bonds now pay competitive
rates, like money market
accounts.
Find out more, call
1-800-US-BONDS.

Bonds held less than five years earn a
lower rate.
A public service of this publication.

U.S. SAVINGS BONDS

THE GREAT AMERICAN INVESTMENT

Tori Blanchette mixes at Ridley's.

put the baking operation in-
to higher gear, or the com-
plications that are peculiar to
the wholesale baked goods
business.
"Wholesale has a lot more
problems than retail," Ridley
says. "The stores have more
control. You can set the
wholesale price, but the
retailer determines the sale
price."
A wholesaler also must
negotiate for good counter
space. You can have the best
product in the world, Ridley
says, but if it's stuck in the
back of the store or under the
counter, it won't sell. Jacob
recalls one incident where
she checked in on an account
and someone had poked a
finger into each of the muf-
fins delivered that day, and
the shopkeeper hadn't
realized it.
Ridley thinks room exists
for both muffin operations in
Detroit, but isn't sure if the
market has reached satura-
tion. The trend toward
healthy baked goods is still
strong, Lahvic says, as
evidenced by the fact that
Hostess, purveyor of Twinkies
and Ho Hos, is now selling a
"light" version of its cupcakes
and a twin pack of oat-bran
muffins.
The bottom line is that the
baking business is a physical-
ly demanding one, requiring
long hours on your feet. All
four women have families to
care for. But the joy of owning
and running their own
businesses, plus the support
they've gotten from family
and friends, makes the effort

worthwhile, they say. Both
businesses see the future as
bright and plan to expand, in-
cluding forays into the na-
tional marketplace.
"We knew the statistics
(small business failure rate)
going in, but we gambled,"
Joyce Sherman says. "We
believed in ourselves and the
product. We believed in our
whole idea."
"We weren't business dumb,
but we weren't business
smart either," Ridley adds.
"We were thrown in very fast,
Of course, we made mistakes.
As long as you learn, you're
going to succeed. You have to
have big ideas." ❑

NEWS I

Czechs Will
Restore Ties

Jerusalem (JTA) — The
president of Czechoslovakia
declared last week that his
country will re-establish dip-
lomatic relations with Israel
next month.
President Vaclav Havel
made the announcement in
Prague to Vice Premier
Shimon Peres, the first
Israeli Cabinet minister to
visit the Czech capital since
Czechoslovakia severed ties
with Israel after the 1967
Six-Day War.
Czechoslovakia would
become the second Eastern
European country to restore
full relations with Israel. In
October, Hungary became
the first to do so. Poland,
which maintains an interest

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