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February 02, 1990 - Image 82

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-02-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

THE NEW

DELI RESTAURANT

352-3840

LA MIRAGE MALL, 29555 NORTHWESTERN HWY, Bet 12 Mile L Inkster

EARLY BIRD DINNER SPECIAL

3 p.m. to 5 p.m. 7

DAYS

ROAST CHICKEN

$39 5

SUSAN LUDMER-GLIEBE

Includes: Soup or Salad, Pot. & Veg. & Bread Basket

BREAKFAST SPECIALS

• 2 EGGS

AACSOHN $
99 l• • 2 BH EGGS

7 a.m. to 11 a.m.
79 • LOX,
yy Earers $ 3 35

BROWNS

ALL INCLUDE BAGEL, KAISER ROLL OR TOAST

BEAUTIFUL TRAYS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
$5.25 per person
MEAT
$8.50 per person
DAIRY

The pike Street

• REGIONAL AMERICAN CUISINE WITH CLASSICAL ROOTS
• AWARD-WINNING CHEF BRIAN POLCYN
CATERING
FOR
• BEAUTIFUL BANQUET FACILITIES UPSTAIRS
ALL
OCCASIONS
• CATERING TO YOUR HOME OR OFFICE
• LUNCH MONDAY-FRIDAY, DINNER TUESDAY-SATURDAY
• 10 MINUTES FROM THE PALACE, AUBURN HILLS

•RESERVATIONS:

334.7878

18 W PIKE STREET, JUST OFF WOODWARE1 DOWNTOWN PONTIAC

HELD OVER SPECIAL!

12 OZ. FRESH BROILED WHITEFISH

THE FINEST BONELESS WHITEFISH FILLET MONEY CAN BUY!

$ 40 0

WITH PURCHASE OF SECOND WHITEFISH AT $5.50

INCLUDES: Soup or Sald (tossed or Greek), Potato or Spaghetti, Bread Basket, Dessert
(strawberry cheesecake, rice pudding, jello or ice cream) and Hot Coffee or Hot Tea.

DINEAN

FAMILY
RESTAURANT

ONLY

OPEN 7 DAYS

22740 WOODWARD AVE. Just South of 9 Mile • Ferndale

THE GREATEST VALUES IN TOWN
ARE UNDER THE BIG RED AWNING

544-7933

"SEMI

C-
31646 Northwestern Hwy., West of Middlebelt, Farmington Hills
8 5 5 -4600

00

oFF

ANY LARGE PIZZA
or LARGE ANTIPASTO
or LARGE GREEK SALAD

• Coupon Must Be Presented When Ordering
• Not Good With Any Other Discounts or Coupons
JN
• Expires 2-8-90

INIIIIIN

74

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1990

The Voice Of The Turtle
Is Being Heard In _The Land

Special to The Jewish News

W

hen the Jews of the
Iberian peninsula
were expelled in
1492 they took with them a
rich musical tradition. The
Sephardic diaspora — which
settled in Morocco, the Ot-
tomon Empire, the Balkans —
kept that tradition alive and,
over the centuries, em-
broidered and enhanced it.
For the past dozen years a
Massachusetts-based quartet,
Voice of the Turtle, has done
its part in introducing —
through performances and
recordings — this relatively
unknown music to the public-
at-large. "When you hear this
music you hear the history in
it and it's this that makes the
music so exciting," explains
Judith Wachs, artist director
of the group.
Sephardic music spans a
wide range of forms, styles
and treatments — from
Judeo-Spanish balladic
"romancero" to children's
songs and dirges; although
songs are sung in Ladino,
there are localisms absorbed
from the Greek, Turkish and
Arabic languages.
"Basically we perform folk
music and para-liturgical
pieces which were sung for
the (religious) holidays but
not in the synagogue," Wachs
says. Some of the pieces are
amusing, such as the song
`Todo Bueno Tengo" which
goes: "Everything is wonder-
ful. I have an old husband .. .
but; Oh, those beautiful
young men!" while others are
lamentations with a
specifically Jewish content
like the song that begins:
"Good-by, Rachel Levi; I go to
Africa to return no more . . ."
In order to reconstruct this
music, Wachs travels fre-
quently to Israel, more
specifically to the Jewish
Music Research Center at
Hebrew University. "We work
from first hand materials,"
Wachs says. "We listen to
tapes of old people singing
songs that they learned from
their parents and grand-
parents."
In the past 70 years there's
been considerable scholarly
interest in Sephardic musical
works. Composers and musi-
cians such as I. Levy, J.H.
Silverman and I.J. Katz have
done interesting fieldwork,
collecting and editing texts
and tunes, recording and
notating from the oral tradi-
tion. But Voice members have

This musical group presents historical music.

found that the best way of
learning this music is more
direct. "For us, as musicians,
it's easier to go from ear to
ear," Wachs says. "We listen
over and over and over again.
It takes a lot of work."
Speaking of work, imagine,
if you will, learning to play
more than two dozen in-
struments that most people
have never heard of . . . or
heard period. There is, for ex-
ample, the rebek, a three-
stringed bowed instrument
ancestor to the violin; and the
chalumeau, a single-reed in-
strument related to the
clarinet; there's the kamanja,
an Islamic fiddle, and the
shawm, a double-reeded in-
strument popular in the Mid-
dle Ages; and the bagpipes,
flutes and harps.
Although all the members
of Voice have musical train-
ing, none of them came from
a Sephardic background (two
members aren't Jewish) and
none was familiar with the
music.
But, as Wachs explains,
none of that matters much —
to the music makers or the
listeners. "You don't have to
be Jewish to enjoy this music.
You don't have to be
anything."
Voice of the Turtle will be

appearing Feb. 3 at 8 p.m. at
the Mandell Berman Center
for University of Michigan
Hillel; Feb. 4 at noon at Adat
Shalom Synagogue; and Feb.
4 at 4 p.m. at Erickson Kiva
Theatre, Hillel at Michigan
State Univesity. ❑

Puppet Theater
Comes To JCC

The Mask Puppet Theatre
will perform A Tree Grows
in Israel and The Monster
That Ate Your Garden at the
Jewish Community Center's
Maple-Drake Building 2:30
p.m. Feb. 11.
After the show, children
will be able to make simple
puppets with the group.
There is a charge. For in-
formation, call the JCC, 661-
1000.

Chenille Sisters
Join Orchestra

The Ann Arbor Symphony
Orchestra will perform two
pops concerts to coordinate
Winterfest '90 as the
Chenille Sisters, plus Carl
St. Clair, appear 8 p.m. Feb.
9-10 at the Michigan
Theater.
There is a charge. For in-
formation, call the Michigan
Theater, 668-8397.

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