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January 27, 1990 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Invitations Redux

There are two versions of this tale,
both with approximately the same
ending. In the first version, the mother
of the bride is ready to mail out the
invitations, all properly addressed by
the calligrapher. She takes them to the
post office; has one weighed; buys and
attaches the postage the postal worker
tells her is required; and mails them
out. Within a few days, the invitations
start coming back to her — stamped
"insufficient postage:" Moral of this
version: always have the invitations
weighed at a minimum of two different
post offices to make sure of the
postage.
In the second version, the mother
of the bride is to blame. She takes the
invitations to the post office and has
one weighed, but without the reserva-
tion card from the hotel and the
mimeographed map which is being in-
cluded in the invitations sent to all
out-of-town guests. Before sealing and
mailing the invitations, she inserts
these items, not realizing that their
weight will increase the postage. With-
in a few days, the out-of-town invita-

tions start coming back to her —
stamped "insufficient postage:' Moral
of this version: always have the invita-
tion weighed with all the insertions.

Caught In The Act

The father of the bride brings the
balance of what he owes the caterer
with him to the reception, several
thousand dollars in cash in an envel-
ope. He arrives at the reception while
the crew is still setting up. Being a
helpful sort, he puts the envelope in
the inside pocket of his tux jacket,
which he drapes over a chair while he
assists the crew. A few minutes later,
when he returns to the chair and
reaches into his jacket pocket, the
envelope is gone.
The father manages to pay the
caterer with a check and the recep-
tion goes on. A few weeks later, the
father gets a call from the photog-
rapher who was hired to videotape the
wedding. "I've got something in-
teresting to show you," he tells the

Lather.

The photographer, who had gone
to the reception early in order to
videotape it from set-up to end, brings
the just-developed video to the father's
house, puts it in the VCR and turns
it on. And there, on video, is the per-
son who walked over to the father's
tux jacket, flipped it back and took out
the cash-filled envelope. Who is the
thief? The father of the groom.

26 Brides 1990

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