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January 19, 1990 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS!

41& CENTER FOR iCirt

4

Wayne State University

JUDAIC STUDIES •••••

Female Soldier, 19,
Stabbed in Old City

ETHIOPIAN JEWRY

Jewish Culture - African Heritage
and the Modern World

GIL SEDAN

Special to The Jewish News

Ephraim Isaac
Institute for Semitic Studies
Princeton, N.J.

S

Dr. Isaac is a specialist in Semitic languages and the religious literature that emerged
around the Middle East after the close of the Old Testament. He is an Ethiopian Jew
whose father came from Yemen and who as a boy learned two Semitic languagues,
Geez and Hebrew. He also spoke two African languages, Oromo and Amharic, which
are Cushitic cousins of the Semitic languages. He received a bachelor's degree at
Concordia College in Minnesota, as well as a degree in divinity at Harvard Divinity
School, and finally a doctoral degree from Harvard in Near Eastern languages, with a
dissertation on classical Ethiopic. He has taught at Harvard, Princeton, The Hebrew
University in Jerusalem and other schools.

TOPIC I
Ethiopian Jewry

CO-HOST: TEMPLE EMANU-EL

Sunday, January 28 12:00 noon
Esther Katzman Social Hall
Temple Emanu-El
14450 W. Ten Mile, Oak Park

Reception by Blue Nile Restaurant
Photo exhibit courtesy of
Holocaust Memorial Center of West Bloomfield

Co-sponsoring organizations:
Jewish Community Council
Jewish Experience for Families
Holocaust Memorial Center of W. Bloomfield
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation at WSU

TOPIC II
Africa and the Judeo-Christian Heritage

CO-HOST: DEPARTMENT OF AFRICANA STUDIES

Monday, January 29 3:00 p.m.
African/American Room
Manoogian Hall (Room 91)
Wayne State University

ADVISORY BOARD

Sanford N. Cohen
Eugene Driker
Arthur Evans
Martin Herman
Evelyn Kasle

Jacob Lassner*
Miriam Mondry
Jack A. Robinson
Mark E. Schlussel
Claude Schochet

Guy Stem
Stanley J. Winkelman
George M. Zeltzer*
Lawrence Ziffer
*co-chairs

The Center is a cooperative venture of the University and the United Jewish Charities
in cooperation with the Jewish Welfare Federation of Metropolitan Detroit.

S TOR Y.

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\\

CO-SPONSORED BY

or,rERIENCES FOR fq

Temple Emanu EI

-

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20

Ping Jewish fAmilles G

14/

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1990

REMEMBER

I

he had planned the
visit for a long time,
but had never gotten
around to making it. On Jan.
15, 19-year-old Dalit Avni,
dressed in her army uniform,
finally went for a stroll in the
Old City of Jerusalem.
Unarmed and unafraid,
despite stories about
violence there, Avni passed
through the Old City walls
and waded into the Oriental
bazaar. She made it as far as
the perfume market, when
she suddenly felt sharp
pains in her back.
An unidentified assailant
had stabbed her seven times
in the back, stomach, chest
and hip. It was the first such
attack in East Jerusalem in
many months.
Arab shopkeepers who
witnessed the stabbing hur-
riedly locked up and rushed
from the scene. None offered
to help the young woman,
who lay bleeding on the
pavement.
An army patrol that
happened by summoned an
ambulance, which took Avni
to Hadassah-Hebrew Uni-
versity Medical Center in
Ein Kerem.
She was fully conscious
when she arrived. Her
wounds were more than
superficial, yet not grave.
Doctors said she suffered
moderate blood loss and
would be released from the
hospital after a few days of
observation.
Avni could not tell the
police much. She had only a
fleeting glimpse of the
assailant.
Police detained 80 people
for questioning. By Monday
night, 20 remained in
custody.
In her hospital bed, Avni
said the assault had not
changed her opinion of
Arabs. "I can understand
them," she said.
The Old City was popular
with Israeli visitors until the
intifada broke out more than
two years ago. Since then,
few Israelis venture into the
narrow alleys of the Arab
neighborhoods.
Soldiers generally go there
only on duty and only when
armed.
In recent months, violence
linked to the intifada has
been limited in Jerusalem to
arson against Israeli cars
and a few unsuccessful gaso-
line-bomb attacks. Israeli

vehicles are routinely ston-
ed.
Police are now in-
vestigating a more serious
incident that may have had
nationalistic motivations.
But they say it also could
have been a purely criminal
matter.
The case involves a Jewish
drug addict, reportedly a
prostitute, who was
murdered 11 days ago in the
Shuafat refugee camp, near
the French Hill
neighborhood, where she
apparently went to buy
drugs.
Observers believe the in-
tifada will intensify in
Jerusalem as the time ap-
proaches to decide whether
East Jerusalem Arabs can
participate in the proposed
Palestinian elections.
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir is adamantly oppos-
ed, on the grounds that
allowing them to take part
might compromise Israel's
sovereignty over East
Jerusalem, which it annexed
after the Six-Day War in
1967. ❑

Jewish Telegraphic Agency

$50 Million
Raised For Fund

New York (JTA) — The
United Jewish Appeal an-
nounced last week that its
1989 Passage to Freedom
campaign for Soviet Jews
raised $50.1 million as of the
Dec. 31 closing.
The amount falls short of
the campaign's ambitious
$75 million goal, but UJA
leaders nevertheless are said
to be pleased with the
results.
UJA National Chairman
Morton Kornreich reported
that UJA had already col-
lected $33 million of the
Passage to Freedom funds
raised.
The announcement coin-
cided with a UJA national
officers meeting here Mon-
day afternoon to discuss
joint plans with the Jewish
Agency to mount a massive
new campaign.
UJA had been expected to
announce a drive to raise
$350 million over five years
for the resettlement effort.
But with Soviet Jews now
flowing through the gates of
Ben- Gurion Airport at an
unprecedented rate of ap-
proximately 2,000 per week,
Israeli officials have
reportedly asked that the
total be doubled.

K

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