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January 12, 1990 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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SHOPPING BAG
DESIGN CONTEST

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ATTENTION ARTISTS! Amateur and professional artists are invited to
submit an entry in Summit Place Mall's Design-A-Shopping-Bag
Contest held now through February 19, 1990.

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1st place
2nd place
3rd place

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PRIZES

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The first place winning entry will be used on Summit Place Mall's
shopping bags which will debut August, 1990.

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$500 cash/ribbon/artwork printed on bag
$300 cash/ribbon
$200 cashlribbon

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RULES & REGULATIONS

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1) Size Specification: Design must be 15"x 15" placed on a
16"x 16" paper. It is imperative that a 1" margin remain
around the design. Artwork should not be matted or framed.

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2) Any media may be used including, but not limited to, oil,
watercolor, charcoal, crayon, textures, acrylics. Any color
background may be used and textured paper will be
accepted. (Please note: The original artwork will be
photographed for shopping bag reproduction therefore
photographs will not be an acceptable form of entry!)

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3) It is not necessary to incorporate the Summit Place Mall
name or logo within the design.

1

4) Entries will be judged on creativity and the design best
suited for representing Summit Place Mall in 1990. Decision
of the five judges will be final.

5) Entries must be submitted to the Information Center
(located by Picnic) during Mall Hours now through 9 p.m.
Monday, February 19, 1990. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION
MUST BE LEGIBLY WRITTEN ON THE BACK OF THE ARTWORK ENTRY:
NAME, ADDRESS, CITYISTATEIZIP, DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER AND
AGE OF APPLICANT. Winners will be notified by phone the
week of February 26, 1990. Entries will be displayed in the Mall
from March 12-18, 1990.

0

6) Entries may be picked up in the Mall Office Wednesday,
March 21, 1990 from 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Entries not picked up
at that time become the property of the Mall.

7) Any age amateur or professional artist may enter, however
all entries will be judged against each other. There will not
be separate age categories. ORIGINAL artwork only!

(5 0 146

M• A L L

Telegraph & Elizabeth Lake Roads
in Waterford Township
Hudson's, JCPenney, Kohl's, Montgomery Ward, Sears

RODNICK BROS., INC.

Fruit

gift

Basket Specialists

SAY

HAPPY OCCASION

THANK YOU, LOVE YOU,
WELCOME BABY GIFTS

* JUST CALL *

Kmae
_i7A

JODI RODNICK



772-4350

DELIVERY
NATIONWIDE

WE'RE NUMBER ONE!

14

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 1990

Don't let the
sun ruin your
furniture
and drapes

Reduce fade-damaging
ultra violet rays
by up to 99%

New Neutral Sun Control Films applied to
the glass inside the windows to reduce
ultraviolet rays, heat and light .. the
three major reasons why carpets,
upholstery and fabrics fade.



Seymour Zate

537-7900

Solar Sales, Inc

— Since 1969 —

New Book Focuses On
The Blessing Of Learning

SUSAN GRANT

Staff Writer

W

ith the help of a new
book by Temple
Israel's Rabbi Paul
Michael Yedwab, learning
Hebrew is as easy as saying
a blessing.
Rabbi Yedwab, with the
backing of the Union of
American Hebrew Con-
gregations, recently
published The Alef-Bet of
Blessing, a primer designed
to teach Hebrew as well as
the basic concepts of
Judaism.
The Ale f-Bet of Blessing is
part of a new UAHC Hebrew
school curriculum. It will in-
clude a workbook and
teachers' manual for better
instruction.
A few years ago, the
UAHC Hebrew Task Force
Curriculum Project decided
it needed a uniform cur-
riculum, Rabbi Yedwab said_
Rabbi Bernard Mehlman
and Rabbi Howard Bogot,
who originally worked on
the project, asked Rabbi
Yedwab, who was studying
at the seminary at the time,
to write a primer that would
introduce the letters and be
self-reenforcing.
He spent last summer
writing and editing The
Alef-Bet of Blessing, which
was published in December.
Rabbi Yedwab hopes
children who see the bright
green cover featuring a
friendly looking lion grabb-
ing the letters clef and bet in
his paws will want to use the
primer. Yet, it is also
designed for adults who
want to learn Hebrew bless-
ings, he said.
Rabbi Yedwab wanted to
make the book as attractive
as possible so both children
and adults want to use it.
But more important, he said,
he wanted to make The Al*
Bet of Blessing easy to use so
students of all ages are en-
couraged to learn.
While other primers begin
by teaching the first letter of
the alef-bet, students using
Rabbi Yedwab's book start
by learning the second
letter, bet. Seven pages and
three letters later, students
can read their first Hebrew
word — baruch, bless.
By the end of the primer,
students learn the blessings
over fruit and bread, as well
as Shabbat and Chanukah
candles. They also learn
blessings said when hanging

a mezuzah, hearing good
news or seeing a rainbow.
Using blessings to teach
Hebrew gives the student
"the immediate gratification
of learning a Jewish word,"
Rabbi Yedwab said.
Most people get frustrated
if they don't learn something
quickly, he said. Blessings
are easy to learn and can be
used in everyday Jewish life.
By learning a word they
can use both at home and at
the synagogue, they are en-
couraged to continue study-
ing, Rabbi Yedwab said.
"Immediately upon learn-
ing the language you learn
the basic blessings of our
people," he said. Students
"will know the key concepts
involved with Judaism."
In addition to offering
lessons for students, The
Alef-Bet of Blessing has some
built-in fun, Rabbi Yedwab
said.
He envisions teachers br-
inging in a loaf of bread or
pieces of fruit, asking the
students to say the proper
blessing and having a party
as a reward for their learn-
ing.
"A blessing is a celebra-
tion," he said.
When students learn the
basic Jewish blessings, they
can go onto the next book in
the series, A Bridge to
Prayer.
"After learning the bless-
ings they can learn the
prayers," Rabbi Yedwab
said. "I want them to get the
feeling that if they can read
the blessings they can read
anything.'"
"I want this book to help

them see the world through
Jewish eyes." 0

AJCommittee
Hosts Speakers

The American Jewish Com-
mittee will host Zvi Gitelman
at 7:45 p.m. Jan. 17 at Con-
gregation Beth Shalom.
Gitelman will lead a discus-
sion on the Communist
upheavel in Eastern Europe.
This program is co-sponsored
by Beth Shalom's cultural
commission.
On Feb. 1 at 7:45 p.m. at
Hillel Day School, Reva
Silverman, research analyst
on Israel and Middle East af-
fairs for the American Jewish
Committee, will discuss pro-
spects for peace in Israel. This
evening is co-sponsored by
Hillel.
For information, call the
Chapter office, 965-3353.

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