100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 05, 1990 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-01-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NOTEBOOK

Major Story Of 90s
Is Already Here

GARY ROSENBLATT

Editor

We are only five
days into the
new decade, but
already one of
the major
themes of the
next 10 years is
emerging: the
emigration of hundreds of
thousands of Soviet Jews to
the West, primarily Israel,
and the major effort needed to
make that absorption process
a success.
Among the factors that
will determine the success or
failure of this historic oppor-
tunity are politics, bu-
reaucratic competence, hu-
manitarianism and fund-
raising.
The financial cost of Soviet
Jewish emigration will be
enormous. The United
Jewish Appeal is about to
launch a campaign to raise
$350 million over the next
five years to help pay for the
Israeli absorption. Are
American Jews prepared to
dig into their pockets that
deeply?
Judging from the success,
or lack of it, of Passage To
Freedom, there is room for
great skepticism. Passage To
Freedom was the national
emergency effort that ended
December 31, and sought to
raise $75 million for Soviet
Jewish resettlement. As of
December 29, the campaign
had raised $49.5 million in
pledges and had collected
about $19 million in cash.
Billed as a one-time
emergency campaign,
Passage To Freedom fell far
short of its goal. Yet now
UJA is going back out to
that same audience and ask-
ing for another $70 million a
year for the next five years.
Some say that Passage To
Freedom is not an accurate
gauge of American Jewry's
willingness to contribute
towards resettlement, that
the campaign was conceived
of and launched quickly and
without proper planning.
They add that there was
much ambivalence as to
whether the money was go-
ing to resettle Soviet Jews
here in America or in Israel,
and that now that it is clear
that the majority of
emigrants will be going to
Israel, there will be greater
enthusiasm among
American Jews to help pay
for resettlement.
But others fear that

American Jews, while sym-
pathetic to this new cam-
paign, will want to first en-
sure that current services
provided at home for them-
selves and their family —
care for the elderly, educa-
tional programs for
youngsters — will be main-
tained before they give to
"others."
What has been missing
from the discussion of Soviet
Jewish resettlement has
been a sufficient sense of
urgency.
A number of observers are
deeply concerned that the
Kremlin's gates of emigra-
tion may swing shut as
quickly as they opened. If we
really believed that this
could happen, we would
surely be acting differently.
We would describe our
efforts more in terms of res-
cue than resettlement. We
would emphasize that a
negative by-product of
glasnost has been an in-
crease in anti-Semitism in
the USSR, now that nation-
alists have more freedom to
express themselves. We
would indicate that with the
USSR unraveling politically
and economically, it is the
Jews who will be
scapegoated and who who
need to flee while they can.
And UJA would have al-
ready launched its new Ex-
odus campaign rather than
just pave the way for it.
Even if we succeed in
lighting a spark under
American Jews and have
them lining up to contribute
to the cause, we are faced
with Israel's political and
bureaucratic quagmire in
spending the funds for ab-
sorption.
In fairness to the govern-
ment in Jerusalem, which is
being accused of not pro-
viding sufficient housing for
the newcomers, it must be
pointed out that any Israeli
official who would have ap-
proved of funding to launch
housing projects for tens of
thousands of Soviet Jews as
recently as six months ago
would have been carried off
in a straitjacket. The
numbers just weren't there,
and suddenly they are.
Now there is talk of at
least 250,000 Soviet Jews
coming to Israel in the next
five years, maybe twice that
number, maybe far more.
And while Israelis are
pleased with the prospect of
increased aliyah and greater
numbers of Jews arriving to
Continued on Page 20

Featuring:
POWER DOOR
LOCKS
ELECTRIC REAR
DEFOGGER

Standard Equipment:
POWER STEERING/
BRAKES
AUTOMATIC
AIR
ROCKER PANEL AND
WHEEL OPENING
MOLDINGS

STK. #386

Now only $ 13,840

.

or lease for

$275.75

per month "

Standard Equipment:
POWER STEERING/
BRAKES
AUTOMATIC
AM/FM STEREO

Featuring:
POWER DOOR
LOCKS
ELECTRIC REAR
DEFOGGER
DIVIDED SEAT
3.1 LITER V-6

Featuring:
ELECTRIC REAR
DEFOGGER
AIR
WHITE SIDEWALL
TIRED

Standard Equipment:
POWER STEERING/
BRAKES
AUTOMATIC
AM/FM STEREO
STEEL BELTED
RADIAL TIRES

or lease for

Now only 11,613

$222.69

per ma*

Standard Equipment:
POWER STEERING/
BRAKES
BUCKET SEATS
CUT PILE CARPETING
STEEL BELTED
RADIAL TIRES

Featuring:
ELECTRIC REAR
DEFOGGER
AIR
AUTOMATIC
TRANSMISSION

OLDSMOBILE SAAB

28000 Telegraph
Tel•12 Mall • Southfield

354-3300

'CUTLASS SUPREME AND DELTA 88 MODELS ONLY
'Closed end lease for qualified customers with $1,000 down. Pymt. bas-
ed on 48 months. First month pymt. and $350.00 security deposit and
license plates. 60,000 mile limitation. 15' per mile over 60,000. Leasee
has no obligation to purchase vehicle at lease end. But has purchase
option at price to be determined, at lease inception. Leasee responsi-
ble for excessive wear and tear. To get total payments multiply monthly
pymt. by 48. Subject to 4% use tax. Plus license, plates, and title.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

3

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan