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December 29, 1989 - Image 66

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-12-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I HEALTH

GAME ROOM SALE

FREE LAYAWAYS

POOL TABLES

• Custom
• Antique
• Contemporary
From $779.95 - $10,000

MS
OE
yR
i v
N 1
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SOCCE • ABLES
BUMPER POOL

$3Y995

RECOVERING
CLOTH
BUMPER POOLS, BILLIARD LIGHTS, AIR HOCKEY
2 PC CUE STICKS 10%-50% OFF
Mon., Thurs.,

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p

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585-3535

Wed., Sat.
10-6;

Sun. 11-4;

TC
u l e o ss d ea dy

A new choice for the frail elderly

Independent Living with
Supportive Services

A new caring alternative for
the frail elderly is now
available at the exciting new
and elegant West Bloomfield
Nursing and Convalescent
Center.

• Deluxe semi-private or private
mini suites all with private
baths and a beautiful view of
a courtyard or wooded
grounds.

It's called Independent Living • Town Center Plaza with a
snack shop, beauty salon,
with Supportive Services. It's
flower and gift shop and an
the choice between
old-fashioned ice cream parlor.
independent living and skilled
nursing care for the elderly
• Fine dining in an elegant
person who needs the
dining area with meals
essentials of living such as
prepared by an executive chef
housekeeping service, meals,
and served by a courteous,
laundry service and
friendly staff-
medication, if needed.
Licensed nurses are on duty 24
hours a day.
• Exciting and varied activities,
planned and supervised, to
Residents in this program can
keep residents involved and
enjoy a relaxed, elegant
happy
atmosphere that includes:

An Affiliate of William Beaumont Hospital

Vesk omdr
ie,/
,‘ Lilitavaz9
and Conoakeceat Ceateil-

6445 West Maple • West Bloomfield, Ml
Phone: 661-1600

AFAKIIMES 524,V17K-VGIS

41-N31, ,

SERI EIS

8-F

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1989

Your resolve to exercise on
your own may evaporate after
the first week of your self-
designed program. Or per-
haps you enjoy the camarad-
erie of other exercisers and
the convenience of an indoor
environment you can't get
rained or snowed out of.
An exercise studio is pro-
bably the answer. But how do
you sort out the legitimate
ones from the fly-by-nights?
Good exercise instructors
will be certified and have that
certification posted in the
studio, says Molly Fox, an in-
structor who runs her own
studio in New York City. Look
for certificates from the Inter-
national Dance and Exercise
Association.
Next, evaluate how well the
studio and the instructor fit
your needs. "There are so
many qualifications one
should have besides a cer-
tificate," she says. Some
things to look for:
• An instructor who will
help you set a realistic fitness
goal and help you achieve it.
Even in a class setting, the
teacher should be able to give
you some personal coaching.
• The instructor should be
knowledgeable about the
field, keeping- abreast of new
information through trade
magazines, professional con-
ventions and attendance at

advanced classes with other
teachers.
• The instructor should pay
primary attention to the stu-
dent, evaluating performance
and giving advice. A good in-
structor is a good listener and
responds to questions. He or
she also will call students by
name, Ms. Fox observes.
• An instructor who is well
organized, with attention to
certain parts of the overall
program on given days.
• Versatility and flexibility.
Ms. Fox points out that a good
teacher will teach a low im-
pact class differently than a
high impact one, or a body
sculpting class differently
than a body blaster class.
• The studio that's clean
and has equipment in good
condition. Look for flooring
that's safe for exercise and
dance — usually wood, never
concrete.
• A program with variety.
You should be able to vary
your exercise routine.
• A studio that's accessible
with classes and workouts
scheduled
for
your
convenience.

Good food is as much as
part of the holiday season as
good company. But many of
the foods prepared for the
holidays can attract the
bacteria that causes food
poisoning, warns Dr. Fred R.
Severyn, Associate Medical
Director of Blue Cross and
Blue Shield of Michigan
(BCBSM).
Stuffing, eggs, meat,
poultry or fish deserve par-
ticular attention, as well as
salads, cream pies, egg nogs,
dips and dressing.
The secret to safe holiday
cooking is simple, Dr. Severyn
says: proper preparation and
serving of food.
• Thaw frozen raw meat,
poultry and fish slowly in the
refrigerator. A quick method
for thawing poultry that's
also safe is dunking the
poultry in its watertight
package in cold water. This
can take from as little as one
hour to eight hours, depen-
ding on the size of the bird.
Check the thawing process
every hour. Never leave the

I

4

Ms. Fox studied with Jane Fonda
in San Francisco before opening
her studio in New York. She's an
active member of IDEA and AFAA.
The Associated Press O.
All rights reserved.

Cooking Tips
For Safe Holiday Season

• Pastoral and weekly Sabbath
services provided by Rabbi
Moshe Polter

Honor us with a visit. Weekdays 9 o.m-8 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday, noon-5 p.m.

Choosing The Right
Exercise Studio

food at room temperature for
long periods of time.
• Make sure work surfaces
are clean before you begin
preparation of food. Utensils
should also be clean, in-
cluding cutting boards used
for raw meat, fish or fowl.
They can be breeding grounds
for bacteria if not thoroughly
washed with hot soapy water
before and after use.
• No one with an infection
should prepare or serve food.
• Wash your hands with
warm water and soap before
preparing food. If you've been
handling raw meat, fowl or
fish, wash hands thoroughly
before beginning on another
dish. This will prevent con-
taminating the new dish.
• Wash a utensil if you've
tasted food with it. Keep your
hands away from the mouth,
nose or hair while preparing
food.
• Keep hot foods hot and
cold foods cold. Bacteria breed
quickly when temperatures
are beween 40 and 140
degrees Fahrenheit.

4

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