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December 22, 1989 - Image 84

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-12-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I BEST OF EVERYTHING I

$30

VINEYARD'S WINE CELLAR & CAFE GIFT CERTIFICATE

$30

GIVE A
$30 GIFT CERTIFICATE
FOR JUST $25

Continued from preceding page

ON ANYTHING IN THE STORE

(EXCLUDING LIQUOR & CIGARE1 lES)

VINEYARD'S WINE CELLAR U CAFE

855.9463

32418 NORTHWESTERN HWY. BET. MIDDLEBELT & 14 MILE • 14 MILE • Farmington Hills
• OVER 50 BASKETS ON DISPLAY • GIFT IDEAS • FOOD TRAYS • FOOD ITEMS • NUT TRAYS • PISTACHIOS
• POPCORN TINS • ITALIAN CAKES • HOLIDAY TRAYS • ETC. • ETC. • ETC. • ETC. • ETC. • ETC.

$30

$30

One of Metropolitan Detroit's
Most Beautiful and Exciting
Restaurant-Lounges

Celebrate New Year's Eve 1989

I Open Menu 3 p.m.-9 p.m.1 New Year's Eve Party 9:30 Seating

Dinner & Dancing to PAM MARTIN & PIZZAZZ

$120 per couple (does not include liquor, tax or gratuity)

Soup: Lobster Bisque

Salad: Caesar or House

Fiber

Choice of 6 Entrees

• Grilled Norwegian Salmon
• 1/2 Dover Sole
• 24 Oz. Excalibur N.Y. Sirloin
• 16 Oz. Veal Porterhouse • Rack of Lamb Provencale • Amish Chix Breast Saute Marte
• All Served Bouquetierre
• New Year's Torte or Raspberry Mousse Parfait

FOR RESERVATIONS: 358-3355

28875 Franklin Road at Northwestern Hwy. and 12 Mile Rd., Southfield

with a carmel coloring.) .. .
Prepare more bean dishes as
main courses in casseroles,
etc.
VIDEO CRITIQUES .. .
by Mike Dembs . . . Tap .. .
"Some movies jump off the
screen and some just sit there.
Tap, unfortunately is more of
the latter. Gregory Hines is
the dancer who must choose
between his art and a life of
crime. Real original idea.
Well, they had to put a story
in there somewhere. The dan-
cing sequences are fine but
the story is lacking. It's one of
these movies that you just sit
back and let happen to you."
Beaches . . . "Put this one
under the heading 'Creepy
Weepy' along with such other
misfires as Terms of Endear-
ment and Six Weeks. You
know the type. Strong-willed
character must help
terminally-ill patient live life.
Bette Midler plays the strong
one, a pop singer whose
friendship with Barbra Her-
shey spans 30 years. Bring
your handkerchiefs. I hate
movies like this that are so
conniving that they have to
force death down your throats
to get you to react. Strictly for
sentimentals."
HAVING SURVIVED
warm flirtations with
crabmeat, Roquefort, red
beans and Manchurian beef,
the lovable pizza is now mak-
ing eyes at potatoes.
According to Jack Hayes in
Nation's Restaurant News,

South American restaurateur
Fernando Pereira, who
operates 15 burger outlets in
Brazil and one in Decatur,
Ga., under the name Cupim,
will introduce a sandwich piz-
za with traditional toppings
and potato crust after the
first of the year.
The PizzBurger, as he will
call it, intends to pull dinner
traffic to Cupim, which
operates in the food court of
a renovated mall . . . One-
year-old Cupim in Decatur
moves about 500 daily tickets
of signature potato bread and
cheese at 69 cents and
another 520 burgers and
cheeseburgers served on its
popular in-store-baked potato
buns at $1.99 and 12.29.

IT'S BEEN there many
years . . . quietly going about
the business of satisfying
customers in the little 24-seat
operation . . . Onion Roll Deli
on Woodward, two blocks
north of 11 Mile in Royal
Oak, is now owned by Sam
Rosens and son Randy, who
took over Sept. 16, 1988, on
birthday of counterman Alex
Yushovsky, son of former
owner, Jim Yushofsky.
Monday and Tuesday,
Onion Roll Deli is open 7:30
a.m. to midnight . . . but then
opens Wednesday at 7 a.m.
and never closes until 4 a.m.
on Sunday.
Onion Roll Deli certainly
fits the bill about good things
coming in small packages. ❑

I ENTERTAINMENT I

"PROBABLY THE WORST THING I EVER DID"

"I hate to go out to dinner, period! I had a million excuses.
The food's no good. The food's good, but over-priced. The
food's o.k., but the place is too far. The food and music are
lousy. The service is horrible. Last week I ran out of excuses."

I

36201262

COMPARE ANYWHERE! . . . IF YOU WANT THE BEST — GIVE US A TEST!
I OPEN 7 DAYS-SUNAHURS 11-10 1

DINE IN & CARRY-OUT AVAILABLE

Chic411318 S

ASTED

I FRI.-SAT. 11-11

MILES

118 SOUTH WOODWARD • ROYAL OAK

JUST NORTH OF 10 MILE NEXT TO ZOO

544-1211

76

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1989

QUALITY AND CONSISTENCY IS OUR PRIORITY!

rn

Co

Playwright Chronicles
More Than Heidi's Life

MICHAEL ELKIN

Special to The Jewish News

S

o what's the story on
Wendy? How did the
Mount Holyoke Col-
lege graduate fashion a ca-
reer for herself out of
theater? What destiny de-
railed her original career
plans of becoming a lawyer?
"Actually," says Wassers-
tein with a laugh, "it all
happened because I wanted
to go shopping."
That was back in her
Mount Holyoke days, when
Wasserstein, a history major
about to assume a congres-
sional summer internship,
took a major break from her
plans and enrolled in a
playwrighting course with a
friend at Smith College.
The change in course came
after her friend suggested
the playwrighting class with
the words, "And then after-
ward, we can shop,"

Wasserstein recalls. Sold on
the dual lures of
playwrighting and purchas-
ing, Wasserstein bagged her
ambition to become a
lawyer. And at Smith Col-
lege, intrigued with her
classes and the notion of
writing for the stage, she
bought into playwrighting
as a career.
After her summer sojourn
to Smith and after gradua-
tion from Mount Holyoke,
Wasserstein enrolled in City
College of New York, taking
classes with playwright
Israel Horovitz and writer
Joseph Heller, whom she
calls "real people."
Wasserstein knew there
were very real problems as-
sociated with making a
lucrative living in theater.
But she also reasoned that
success was not impossible.
"It's not like they were liv-
ing in garbage cans," says
Wasserstein of role models
Horovitz and Heller.

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