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December 22, 1989 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-12-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Guidelines For The December Dilemma

Continued from Page L-1

symbol has n _ o place in the Jewish
home.

Is it appropriate to give
Christmas gifts to Christian friends?
It is not inappropriate to give

Christmas gifts or cards to our
Christian friends if we so desire.
These should not be given to our
fellow Jews. We present a gift to
someone in honor of the holiday he
or she celebrates.

Should Jewish children
participate in Christmas plays in
public schools?

No Jew, child or adult, should
participate in any kind of Christmas
observance. To act otherwise is to
hold one's own faith in contempt
and to view the Christian faith with
disrespect by "play-acting" with
something sacred to others.
Christian themes have no place in a
public school. Jewish children
should not be expected to
participate in these activities.
On the other hand, some
schools hold a so-called "winter
festival" in which an attempt is
made to avoid all religious
connotations. It is exceedingly hard,
however, to draw a distinction.
Should we press for equivalent
Chanukah observances in the public
schools?
Chanukah is in no way the
equivalent of Christmas, and it
neither can nor should be treated in
that way. Chanukah is a minor

8 Burning
Questions

1) What is the primary mitzvah of
Chanukah?
2) Why do we light the Chanukah
candles?
3) Who is required to do this
mitzvah?
4) When should the candles be lit?
5) How long must the candles
burn?
6) Where should the candles be lit?
7) How are the candles placed and
lit in the menorah?
8) What is the ceremony for lighting
the candles?

Answers on Page L-4

eChaid l - l

THE JEWISH NEWS

27676 Franklin Road
Southfield, Michigan 48034
December 22, 1989
Associate Publisher Arthur M. Horwitz
Jewish Experiences for Families
Adviser Harlene W. Appelman

L-2

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1989

festival in the Jewish calendar, of
lesser importance that Pesach or
Sukkot. It should not be presented
as the Jewish counterpart, either in
observance or sanctity, of a major
Christian celebration. Furthermore,
two violations of the Constitution
don't make for a better America.
On the other hand, I am not
one of those who believe that we
must fly in the face of reality, always
to our own disadvantage. If the
schools ask for Chanukah
observance, we won't improve the
situation by refusing our aid. This
becomes a delicate decision,
choosing a lesser of two evils.
There are some situations where we
should accept the introduction of
Chanukah in the public schools,
albeit with caution and
thoughtfulness.

Do we harm our children by
directing them not to participate in
Christmas celebration?

this season of the year, Jewishness
becomes associated for too many
children (and some adults) not with
difference and uniqueness, but with
deprivation and denial. If
Jewishness means only that we
may not have the religious festivals,
symbols and songs of others —
then an attitude of resentment and
regret may be fostered. But if the
Jewish way of life includes ritual
and celebration, family activity and
festivity; if Jewishness is joyous and
meaningful, then it becomes a
source of pride and leads to a
wholesome acceptance of oneself
and one's heritage.
The question of December is
part of the larger issue of affirming
Jewish values and making them
meaningful in the lives of both the
older and the younger generations
every day of our lives. 0

The classroom is but one
among many places which reveal
the existence of differences among
the Americans. Religious differences
are significant differences. We
further our children's personal
growth when we teach them this
fact by such simple statements as
"This is what we do," and "This is
what we don't do." Non-participation
in Christmas celebrations will not
harm the Jewish child whose
parents have given him a warm
appreciation of his own Jewish
heritage. Such harm can ensue only
when the absence of affirmative
Jewish experience leaves the child
in a spiritual vacuum.
The problem arises when at

Chanukah Word Search

DIRECTIONS: The
following Chanukah words
can be found in the puzzle
below. Carefully circle each
word. Words may be written
top to bottom, bottom to top,
diagonally, right to left, or
left to right. Once you have
completed the puzzle write
the unused letters down at
the bottom of the page to
find a special message for
Chanukah.

JUDAFITH

E

EAKEERG

HS

RNENIHA

YIK

UT

OYINA

GFUS

S

I

P

I

N

B

OK

AO

H

A

L

EL

0

MAC

AM

K

OF

C

A

MAHSPLDLR

U

N

See Answers, Page L-5

A H 0 E N P M

SRATESMI
I

MACCABEES

S A T A L T I

LCHARYE

ALEXANDER THE GREAT
AL HA-NISIM
ANTIOCHUS
BOOK OF MACCABEES
CANDLES
DEDICATION
DREIDEL
GELT
GREEK
HANNAH
HANUKKAH
HANUKKIYAH
HASMONEAN
HOLIDAY
HOLY TEMPLE
JERUSALEM
JUDAH THE MACCABEE
KISLEV
LATKES
MACCABEE
MATTHIAS
MENORAH
MIRACLE
OIL
PARTY
POTATO PANCAKES
SHAMMASH
SUFGANIYOT
SYRIANS

BEECHEI

AHOCDYN

EHCHS

TY

FIAPCNL A

MU

E

A

E

MY

OKAAAOH

DS

R

A

K

GO

LKNMCHL

GE

R

E

T

AS

NAIR

YSIUC

RE

D

T

A

ER

GEHT

RE

DNAXELA

L

IL

AC

LE

A

A

A AK L P

T

EH

AR

ONEMYFIEN

AI

HT

T

HT

EEL

C

I

H

AMEDDS

C

AR

I
KISL

OR

P

TMI A

IM

EV

ER

ND

Puzzle by Judy Silberg Loebl

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