100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 22, 1989 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-12-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ANALYSIS I

■.■

Shvit

(verb, noun) . . . Sounds like it's spelled (Sh...viz) . . . The
act of sweating during all areas of fitness offered at the
JCC Men's Health Club. A place to sit and sweat and
smooze after a game of tennis or racquetball, squash,
walleyball, swimming, jogging or just to relax.

Scholars Differ Widely
On Views Of Intifada

ALAN H. FEILER

JCC Men's Health Club Membership

$150 off in January!

(Now that's something to Shvitz about!)

• must not have been a health club member in past year.
• Y2 down, balance in 90 days.
• good January 1990 only.

For more information contact the Membership Office 666-1000 ext. 265, 266

4

All Glasses

. . . . .„

)

,.,te
1/2 OFF

Optical Plus can also serve your medical
and surgical eyecare needs through the
Michigan Eyecare Institute where the
finest ophthalmology services are
provided by experienced
board-certified
physicians

GUESS WHO'S
COMING TO
COLONY
INTERIORS

SUGAR TREE • W. BLOOMFIELD

\I

COATS
UNLIMITED

_

/



Sterling Heights

.....

. : .....
.......

Sterling Place
37680 Van Dyke at 16 1/2 Mile

939-0700

On

L.% OPTICAL PLUS OF MICHIGAN

Jr" ik A,

14555 Levan
Livonia, Michigan
464,7800

MAIN OFFICE
19877 Telegraph, Ste. 103
Southfield, Michigan
355-9111

2961 West Road
Trenton, Michigan
675,5646

Oak Park
Lincoln Center, Greenfield at 10i5 Mile
968-2060

West Bloomfield
Orchard Mall, Orchard Lake
at Maple (15 Mile) • 855-9955

"Where You Come First"

Kosins

Uptown
Southfield Rd. at
11% Mile • 559-3900

Big & Tall
Southfield at
101/2 Mile • 569-6930

. a new concept in high fashion
for the full figured woman

Holiday & Resortwear
Arriving Daily
Applegate Square • Northwestern at Inkster • 354 4560

-

60

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1989

CLASSIFIEDS
GET RESULTS!

Call The Jewish News

354.6060

Special to The Jewish News

M

ore than a dozen
Middle East experts
gathered in
Baltimore recently to put
the Palestinian uprising into
perspective.
They offered a variety of
views on the two-year-old in-
tifada. Some said that Israel
should begin immediate
negotiations with the
Palestine Liberation
Organization (PLO) and
some took the position that
the Jewish state must find a
more suitable partner at the
peace table.
"There are no military
means to end the intifada
with Israel's democratic
values and self-image set in
place," said Dr. Myron
Aronoff, chairman of the
department of political
science at Rutgers Univer-
sity in New Brunswick, N.J.
"It's in the best interests of
the nation to take risks. The
future is rife with as many
possibilities for peace as
dangers. The intifada has
proven Israel cannot have a
resolution without dealing
with the PLO. Otherwise,
there' could be some serious
hardening on both sides of
the conflict."
Aronoff made his com-
ments last week at
Baltimore Hebrew Univer-
sity's nine-hour "Conference
on Israel and the Intifada."
Representing a wide variety
of political views, the ex-
perts spoke at the marathon
session co-sponsored by the
university and agencies of
Baltimore's Jewish federa-
tion.
Dr. Robert 0. Freedman,
dean of graduate studies at
BHU and chairman of the
event, said the conference
was the first of its kind. Par-
ticipants discussed the na-
ture of the intifada, external
responses to it and the upris-
ing's effect on Israeli politics
with more than 180 au-
dience members.
The major blockage toward
negotiations, said David
Peleg, minister of informa-
tion at the Israeli embassy,
is finding a partner for
peace.
"It's like playing chess
with yourself," Peleg said.
Calling the election plan of
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir "sincere and
imaginative," Peleg said no
Arab groups, including the
PLO, have come forth to em-
brace the peace initiative.

King Hussein:
Most threatened.

"We came up with a pro-
posal and didn't get an an-
swer ," he said.
"Palestinians should ask
themselves what would have
happened if they answered
our call for negotiations in
1978 [in the Camp David ac-
cords]. They would be in a
progressive stage of negotia-
tions by now. But they
wanted 100 percent of their
demands met. They've never
been open to compromise.
But we feel there are leaders
in the West Bank and Gaza
who realize the only solution
will be a compromise."
Dr. Ken Stein, director of
Middle East Studies and pro-
fessor of history at Emory
University's Carter Center,
said that although the in-
tifada and the Arab upris-
ings of the late 1930s used
similar protest tactics, the
focus of each was different.
He said today's Palestinians
are pursuing a nationalist
cause for statehood rather
than a matter of land and
village preservation.
Because the intifada is a
nationalist movement
rather than a series of
isolated terrorist actions,
Israel has been unable to
suppress the uprising, said
Dr. Bard O'Neill, director of
Middle East Studies and di-
rector of studies of insurgen-
cy and revolution at the Na-
tional War College in
Washington, D.C.
Helena Cobban, research
associate at George Mason
University in Fairfax, Va.,
said that the close relation-
ship between "diaspora"
Palestinians and the pro-
testers in the occupied ter-
ritories will force Israel to
recognize the need to
negotiate with the PLO.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan