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December 22, 1989 - Image 120

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-12-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SINGLE LIFE

SINGLES

Their Futures

Continued on preceding page

IT'S THE
ONLY SPOT IN TOWN

THIS SUNDAY 9:00 p.m.

$7.00 Admission —

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Maple/Drake Building

• DJ

• Dancing

• Refreshments

• Ands Lots More!

For further information call 661-1000, ext. 347

Sponsored by:

The Community Network for Jewish Singles,

The Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan Detroit

and

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Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
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112

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1989

ed an older brother to
Phoenix and soon was joined
in Arizona by the rest of her
family, including her
parents.
"I thought, 'I'm never go-
ing back to Detroit.' When I
left, I was gone, history, no
more Susie Merkow around
here." Jobs for special edu-
cation teachers were abun-
dant, so Merkow quickly set-
tled in, expecting Detroit
friends to move west, too.
She eventually earned a
master's degree in counsel-
ing at Arizona State Univer-
sity, but the Detroit friends
only visited and disen-
chantment slowly settled in.
"The weather became very
predictable," she said. "I
found myself asking,
`Doesn't it ever rain here?'
The sun was out every day;
the snow is man-made
because there is no winter.
and I found I missed the
change in seasons."
Furthermore, Merkow
said, "There's no real Jewish
community there, so the
feeling of family didn't exist
like it does in Detroit. People
are very transient there."
Though she made friends,
and became very active as a
Phoenix Jewish Community
Center singles leader, she
realized Detroit's Jewish
community was more
organized socially, and was
better.
"It (the Phoenix area)
didn't feel like home to me,"
she said. In Detroit, "I knew
who my friends were, who I
could turn to. I never felt
secure (in Phoenix) like I did
in Detroit. But I didn't really
realize it until I came back."
That happened in July
1988, when Merkow return-
ed to Detroit for the first
time in 11 years. Returning
again in September, she saw
the leaves in their fall colors
and that was it. "Oh, it was
beautiful," she said.
Although Detroit pays far
better salaries than does
Phoenix for special-ed
teachers, it was her friends,
not just the money, that
brought her back. Growing
up in the area, too, made it
easier to readjust, despite
the 12 intervening years.
Merkow said she doesn't
know if she'll stay in
Southfield forever, but she
will not leave Michigan
again. Although her siblings
all got married out west, "I
do know for sure I would
never move back there."
Like Merkow, Bob Levy
has come to feel his future is
back in the Detroit area,
rather than in Los Angeles,
Calif., where he spent the
past 17 years in advertising
and public relations.

LA's huge Jewish com-
munity of 530,000; while far
larger than Detroit's 65,000,
is, like Phoenix's, "not very
rooted, but is scattered all
over," said Levy, who • left
Detroit in 1972.
By contrast, he said,
Detroit Jewry is "more
cohesive, active, involved."
Detroiters are "much more
family conscious, more
friendly and much less
pretentious" than their LA
counterparts, whom Levy
describes as "much more
showy, superficial, much
more caught up in the whole
Hollywood scene, which
permeates the atmosphere."
With many more • Jewish
singles, LA has much more
to do than does Detroit, said
Levy, citing the Jewish

However, it wasn't
the potential
danger of her work
that made her
decide to come
back to Detroit.

Association for Single Pro-
fessionals, which he helped
organize and which drew
500 to 1,000 people to its
monthly charity dances.
A Wayne State graduate
who went west because "I
felt Detroit was too hemmed
in" opportunity-wise, Levy
became involved in nu-
merous Jewish and nonsl=c-
tarian communal organiza-
tions. He is pleased with the
warm welcome he's received
from similar groups in
Detroit — and the lower cost
of living in Michigan hasn't
hurt, either.
"I can live like a king out
here," he said, noting his
condominium in Auburn
Hills would cost about three
times as much in Los
Angeles.
Levy, a fundraising con-
sultant based in Rochester
Hills, said he became bored
with Los Angeles, wanted to
be near his ailing mother
and other family members,
and wanted to get married.
"I've never been married,
and I figured if I don't meet
Miss Wonderful here, forget
it," he said. "Well, I met so-
meone very special, met her
a month after I got back, and
we're planning to get mar-
ried."
Levy, 41, feels Detroit is
great for marrying and rais-
ing a family. "I would not
want to live in LA and be
married because there is too
much external stimulation,
which makes your marriage
that much more difficult,"
he said.
Although Levy might miss

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