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December 15, 1989 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIT E
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complex, both measures
have been incorporated into
an omnibus crime package
assembled to Sen. Joseph
Biden, D-Del. The Biden
package is expected to move
quickly when the Senate
reconvenes.
"You don't want to start
advocating for those kinds of

provisions right away,
because it looks like you're
giving up on the fight
against the death penalty,"
Moshenberg said. "On the
other hand, as long as states
do have the death penalty,
we want to make sure that
it's not handed out in a dis-
criminatory fashion."

Committee May Lose
Key Refugee Player



Rep. Bruce Morrison, D-
Conn., a major player in
immigration and refugee
issues since he took over the
House Subcommittee on
Immigration, Refugees. and
International Law earlier
this year, is expected to an-
nounce that he will join the
gubernatorial race in Con-
necticut.
Morrison was a primary
proponent of legislation to
restore the automatic
presumption of refugee
status for Soviet Jews and
has won high marks from ac-
tivists for his commitment to
their issue.
If Morrison does leave, the
committee will be in good
hands. In line to succeed him
are Reps. Barney Frank, D-
Mass., Chuck Schumer,
D-N.Y. and Howard Ber-
man, — all Jewish
and all committed to finding
a good balance between the
needs of Soviet Jews and the

growing demands of other
refugee groups. Because of
other committee
assignments, some Soviet
Jewry activists consider
Berman the likeliest choice
for the critical job.
The subcommittee will
take on growing importance
in the coming months, as
Congress grapples with a
possible reauthorization of
the Refugee Act —and with
growing demands for a
major overhaul of the entire
refugee and immigration
system.
"We're looking at a time
when we're seeing some
major changes in the defini-
tions of refugee status," said
Mark Talisman, director of
the Washington Action Of-
fice of the Council of Jewish
Federations. "We're seeing
an overall assault on the en-
tire refugee system that will
have implications for years
to come."

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Siskind May Not Get
Civil Rights Post

It appears that the ex-
pected nomination of
Lawrence Siskind to the top
Justice Department civil
rights post will be going to
John R. Dunne, a former
New York state legislator.
Apparently, the ad-
ministration has shifted in
favor of Dunne, Siskind's
primary opponent, who is a
former New York state
legislator. And according to
sources here, Siskind, a
Jewish lawyer, is not pleas-
ed with the administration's
unexpected support for his
primary opponent. Sources
say that Siskind had been all
but assured of the appoint-
ment and had made plans to
move to Washington. There
are reports that he may now
withdraw his name from
consideration and throw his
weight behind the candidacy
of Michael Martinez, a

private Salt Lake City at-
torney.
During the Reagan ad-
ministration, the critical
post was held by William
Bradford Reynolds, who was
widely criticized for his
weak enforcement of federal
civil rights legislation.
The job has been vacant for
more than a year. Early this
year, the Bush administra-
tion nominated William
Lucas to the post. Lucas, a
black Republican from
Michigan, was criticized by
civil rights groups because of
his lack of experience in civil
rights law. After a bitter
congressional fight, the
nomination was rejected.
Some Jewish groups quiet-
ly wrote letters supporting
Siskind's candidacy, based
on their judgment that he
was the most pro-civil rights
nominee.



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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

35

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