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December 15, 1989 - Image 104

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

COOKING I

Before You Buy Salami,
Check The Facts

TIraditional Treats
For Chanukah

NAOMI ARBIT

Special to The Jewish News

T

Were not ordinary. Our Salami is
made only with:

The Government allows ordinary
Salami to be made with:

4
4
4
4
4

Frozen Beef , Pork or
Poultry

Meat By-Products

Artificial Flavors

Artificial Colors

Cereal Fillers or Other
Extenders

100% Fresh,
Great Tasting Beef

No Meat By-Products
of Any Kind

No Artificial Flavors

No Artificial Colors

No Fillers or
Extenders of Any
Kind

Traditional New York Delicatessen
We're Kosher. We answer to a higher authority

YOU'LL FIND PREMIUM QUALITY

HEBREW NATIONAL SALAMI AT:

PICKLE BARREL

NINO SALVAGGIO

19801 WEST TWELVE MILE
SOUTHFIELD; MI

18592 HARPER
ST. CLAIR SHORES, MI 48081

STAGE & CO.

NINO SALVAGGIO

6873 ORCHARD LAKE ROAD
WEST BLOOMFIELD, MI

32906 MIDDLEBELT
FARMINGTON HILLS, MI 48018

DELI UNIQUE

6724 ORCHARD LAKE ROAD
WEST BLOOMFIELD MI

RALPH'S DELI

EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTOR:

Leikofsky & Company
8634 Fenkell Ave.
Detroit, MI 48238
Tel: (313) 864-4465

3955 TELEGRAPH RD, BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MI
2442 FRANKLIN, BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MI
6527 TELEGRAPH RD, BIRMINGHAM, MI

L

104

j

JEWELRY APPRAISALS

At Very Reasonable Prices Call For An Appointment

/!

established 1919

k.

30400 Telegraph Road
Suite 134
Birmingham, MI 48010
FINE JEWELERS
(313) 642-5575

GEM/DIAMOND SPECIALIST

AWARDED CERTIFICATE BY GIA
IN GRADING AND EVALUATION

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1989

DAILY 10-5:30
THURS. 10-7
SAT. 10-3

radition is what is im-
portant about our holi-
days. Chanukah, the
eight-day Festival of Lights,
has several traditions. To
commemorate a historic
struggle for their religious
freedom, Jewish families
around the world light one
new candle on the menorah
each evening. On the eighth
day of the festival, the fami-
ly's entire menorah glows.
Food customs are tradi-
tional at Chanukah. Potato
pancakes, or latkes, are the
most popular. Foods cooked in
oil commemorate the fact
that a meager amount of oil
miraculously burned for eight
days and nights, 2,100 years
ago, when the Maccabees
recaptured and rededicated
the Temple in Jerusalem.
Symbol cookies represent
traditional Hebrew shapes,
including the Lion of Judah
and the dreidel, a child's toy.
Potato pancakes are light,
just right to serve with meat,
poultry or fish. They can be
served at lunch or dinner,
with omelets or scrambled
eggs at breakfast, or are
wonderful anytime by
themselves, served with a
generous helping of ap-
plesauce, sour cream or
yogurt. Pancakes should be
tender and golden brown,
panfried and never greasy.
Larger potatoes are easier
to handle using a vegetable
peeler to remove the thinnest
peel possible. Potatoes won't
discolor if you shred them
coarsely and directly into cold
water. The secret of crisp-
every-time latkes is to extract
as much moisture as possible
from the potatoes.
To do this, simply wring the
shredded potatoes and onions
in a towel. This also prevents
the batter, a mixture of
shredded potatoes, onions,
eggs and flour, from becoming
watery and sticking to the
pan while cooking. The batter
will darken if it stands too
long. The taste of the latkes
won't be affected, but they
will be less attractive.
When ready to cook, use on-
ly as much oil as necessary,
lightly flatten them with a
spatula, brown on both sides,
turning only once.
To freeze latkes: Fry on
each side only until golden.
Drain on paper towels. Freeze
in single layers on baking
sheets lined with foil. Once
frozen, remove from baking
sheets and store in plastic

bags. They will not stick
together. Place frozen latkes,
in one layer on foil-lined bak-
ing sheets; bake at 400
degrees until crisp and
brown, about 5 to 10 minutes.

CLASSIC POTATO
LATKES
4 large potatoes (3 lbs.)
cold water
1 onion
2 eggs
1/3 cup all purpose flour
2 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. pepper
vegetable oil
Note: Cholestreol and
saturated fat content can be
reduced by replacing eggs
with- egg substitutes. Two egg
whites may be substituted for
each egg.
Peel potatoes; rinse under
cold running water. Into a
large bowl half-filled with

cold water, coarsely shred
potatoes and onion. In a col-
ander lined with a clean towel
or cheese cloth, drain
potatoes and onion. Wrap
potatoes and onion in towel;
squeeze to remove as much
water as possible. In same
large bowl, beat eggs; return
potatoes and onion. Add flour,
salt and pepper; stir until
well mixed. In a large skillet
over medium heat, in 1/3 cup
vegetable oil, drop potato
mixture by scant 1/4-cupfuls
into 4 mounds 3-inches apart.
Flatten each to make a 4-inch
pancake. Cook pancakes until
golden brown on one side,
about 4 minutes; turn and
brown other side. Remove to
paper-towel lined cookie sheet
to drain; keep warm in low
oven. Repeat to make 12 more
pancakes, stirring potato mix-
ture occasionally and adding
oil to the skillet if needed. Ar-
range pancakes on warm
platter; garnish with sprigs of
fresh parsley. Serve im-
mediately with apple sauce,
and/or sour cream or yogurt.
For a luncheon treat: Divide
pancakes between individual

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