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December 08, 1989 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

l'EmmImmm""nimmi l LOCAL NEWS

Super Sunday

Continued from Page 1

and clothing. They attend dai-
ly English classes at the
Jewish Cmmunity Center
and receive job training
through the Jewish Voca-
tional Service.
But there are other local
needs. The Jewish Family
Service has aided 1,400
Jewish individuals this year
living at poverty level, ar-
ranging for them to receive
federal grants for basic needs.

In the Detroit area, 200
home-bound persons receive
daily Meals on Wheels, pro-
vided by JFS and National
Council of Jewish Women
with Campaign assistance.
Elderly individuals receive
specialized nursing care at
the Jewish Home for Aged's
Borman Hall and Prentis
Manor. Some of the more
than 300 residents of these
facilities need financial
assistance to cover the
$75-per-day cost. There are
increasing numbers of ailing
elderly in the community and
those without private finan-
cial means.
More than 500 elderly per-
sons live in Jewish Federation
Apartments in Oak Park and
West Bloomfield.
Around the world, Cam-
paign funds are needed to
maintain a lifeline to even
the smallest Jewish com-
munities. The Joint Distribu-
tion Committee (JDC) and
the Jewish Agency for Israel

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unequalled performance on land or at sea.

The Jewish Agency
has been forced to
slash its budget.

Only at your Official Rolex Jeweler.

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1989

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are major Campaign
beneficiaries, providing direct
relief and social services to
Jews in 34 countries and
Israel.
In Eastern Europe, JDC
funding helps Jewish people
maintain their religious iden-
tity, while providing basic
necessities.
In Hungary, the Pava
Center in Budapest serves
kosher lunches and is used as
a day care center for elderly
Jews. Two nights a month it
reaches out to the young by
transforming into a disco.
After 50 years, the JDC has
been allowed back in the
Soviet Union, providing for
Jewish cultural and religious
needs.
A large percentage of Cam-
paign funds are used to sup-
port Jewish Agency programs
in Israel. In the midst of
severe economic strains, the
government has cut back on
subsidies for food, education
and medical care. At the same
time, the Jewish Agency has

been forced to slash its budget
in order not to go deeper into
debt.
The Jewish Agency has
budgeted for 14,000 new im-
migrants this year, but it is
clear that many more will be
coming. In October alone,
1,500 Soviet Jews arrived in
Israel, and that number is ex-
pected to climb to 3,000 a
month in the near future.
Money raised for Israel will
provide immigrant housing,
vocational counseling and job
placement.
Funding is also needed to
help families in 160 rural
settlements within Israel's
pre-1967 borders — settle-
ments that have yet to
achieve economic in-
dependence due to cuts in
government funding for new
agricultural and industrial
development.

Formal Campaign
Opening Dec. 13

Pulitzer Prize-winning jour-
nalist A.M. Rosenthal will ad-
dress the fate and future of
Israel at the 1990 Allied
Jewish Campaign opening
event 7 p.m. Dec. 13 at Adat
Shalom Synagogue.
Rosenthal, who last month
was a featured speaker at the
Council of Jewish Federa-
tions' General Assembly, has
worked for the New York
Times as a reporter, foreign
correspondent, executive
editor and columnist for the
past 40 years.
Admission to Rosenthal's
presentation is open to con-
tributors of $1,000 or more to
the 1990 Campaign. There
will be no solicitation of gifts
at the meeting. There is a
charge, and reservations are
required. For information,
call the Jewish Welfare
Federation, 965-3939, Ext.
119. ❑

Laker Concert
At Shaarey Zedek

Three cantors will appear
7:30 p.m. Dec. 10 at Cong.
Shaarey Zedek.
The cantors are: Cantor
Paul Kowarsky of Beth
Tzedec Congregation, Toron-
to; Cantor Abraham Lubin of
Anshe Emet Synagogue,
Chicago and Cantor Chaim
Najman of Congregation
Shaarey Zedek. They will be
joined by the Shaarey Zedek
Synagogue Choir under the
direction of Mr. Eugene Zweig
and will be accompanied by
Dr. Sholom Kalib. Special
commentary will be provided
by Rabbi Irwin Groner. There
is no charge.

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