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December 02, 1989 - Image 48

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1\0 13LIA

NOBLIA'S OUTSTANDING SELECTION OF FINE LEATHER STRAP
TIMEPIECES CAPTURE EVERY MOVEMENT OF TIME WHILE ENCASING
IT IN CLASSIC STYLE. FOR HIM AND HER. PRICED AT $225.

N

NOBLIA

Warranted to the Year 2001.

For details, see manufacturer's warranty.

All merchandise is offered at outstanding discount prices.
All sales can be exchanged or refunded. Gift wrapping is free.

WIEINTILAIM

"Sunset Strip" 29536 Northwestern Highway, Southfield, Michigan 48034
Phone: 357-4000
HOLIDAY HRS.: M - F 10 - 7, Sat. 10 - 6, Sun. 12 - 5

GIVE LEATH ER TO
SOMEONE YOU LOVE.

A

PURVEYOR OF FINE LEATHERS

150 W. Maple

1

/2 Block West of Woodward
In Downtown Birmingham
644-4415

Holiday Hours: M-Fri 10am-9pm, Sat 10am-6pm, Sun 12n-5pm

B

The First
Thanksgiving

W

hile thousands of Amer-
icans will sit down to a
feast of turkey, stuffing,
cranberry sauce and
other assorted fixings this
Thanksgiving, the original event
was a much more modest affair.
Venison and cod, lobster and sea
bass, squash, beans and artichokes
probably comprised at least part of
the historic peace-feast between the
Wampanoag Indians and the Pil-
grim settlers 367 years ago in
Plymouth, Massachusetts.
In the fall of 1621, the 52 men,
women and children who survived
the first year in the New World after
leaving England on the Mayflower
decided to hold a celebratory feast.
Fifty others died of frostbite,
pneumonia and starvation. Just
four adult housewives survived the
first winter.
Two primary references from the
first Thanksgiving remain, in-
cluding a diary kept by Gov.
William Bradford. They show that
the feast included cod, sea bass, wild
fowl such as geese, ducks and
swans, wild turkeys, corn meal and
five deer brought by the Indians,
about 90 of whom attended.
Some of the vegetables were eaten
raw but most were boiled. Cranber-
ries, plentiful in New England, also
were served.
Beer was the liquid of choice, even
for children, since the water was
considered unreliable. Among the
desserts served were pudding and
ashcakes, which were cornmeal
cakes baked in ashes.
There was no cider, because apple
and other fruit trees would take
years to bear fruit after planting. No
potatoes, no corn on the cob, no
molasses, no coffee or tea either.
The Pilgrims and Indians broke a
variety of breads at cloth-covered
tables sitting on benches; some of
the important men had chairs.
There were some knives and forks,
but no spoons. Hands were the uten-
sils of choice.
The feast was formalized under
President George Washington, who
set aside Thursday, Nov. 26, 1790, as
the first officials day of Thanksgiv-
ing for "the many signal favors of
Almighty God."

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