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November 17, 1989 - Image 41

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ROLEX

Christianity and Islam's re-
lations with Judaism and
Israel, Hartman said. It ex-
plains why the Arabs don't
recognize the State of Israel
and the Vatican doesn't ac-
cept Jewish rule over
Jerusalem. It explains why
the re-enacting of the
biblical struggle focused
on the. Temple Mount. For
whoever rules the Temple
Mount — the navel of the
world; the spot where Isaac
was bound — is the accepted
one, Hartman saki,

It also explains why
Israelis — even the most
secular, anti-mystical
among them — "will com-
promise on everything, ex-
cept Jerusalem," Hartman
said.
"Mark my words: the issue
is Jerusalem."
Jerusalem is the Jews'
statement to the world: "We
did not come back because of
the Holocaust. Or to build a
haven for homeless Jews.
Israel is not the result of a

The legacy of the
Jews — the
stranger, the
"other" in history
— is that the
important mitzvah
is not to love your
neighbor as
yourself, but to
love the stranger
as yourself.

United Nations resolution.
It is to show that our cove-
nant with God has not been
superseded," Hartman said.
"It is our vindication."
But pursuing endlessly the
biblical paradigm of the
blessed son and the rejected
son will turn Jerusalem into
a city of blood, he added.

"Now Jews are saying,
`It's our turn to claim
Jerusalem.' The issue now is
the soul of our people. Did
we preach morality through
the ages because we were
weak? Was it rooted in self-
interest?"

According to Hartman,
morality does not lie in
disposessing the other peo-
ple — the other son — living
in the land of Israel: the
Palestinians. Both the

Likud's autonomy plan and
Labor's Jordanian option
preserve the illusion for
Israelis that there is only
one sovereign people in the
land, he said.
The Palestinians, too, in
their quest for self-
determination, fail to under-
stand the Jews'intimate
connection to the land,
Hartman said.
"The Palestinians saw us
as Holocaust victims. As
aliens. They didn't hear our
prayers through the cen-
turies for the dew to fall in
the Galilee. Strange to pray
for farmers who are buried
in the Galilee.
"No one heard that long-
ing. No one heard that song.
Because theologically (to the
Moslems and Christians) we
were finished. We walked
through history mute,
silent."
He compared Palestine
Liberation Organization
leader Yassir Arafat's accep-
tance of United Nations
Resolutions 242 and 338 to
uttering kabbalistic invoca-
tions. "I want Arafat to say
one line: 'We (the Jews) have
come home.' That's the
line."
Israelis and Palestinians
live in a country where each
one can't see the other,
Hartman said. "An invisible
enemy who haunts you.
Each one has a demonic
image of the other. Each one
sees the other's vitality as a
threat."
So is there hope?
One must begin by putting
his own house in order,
Hartman said. "We came
back into history to tell the
world that 'One World —
One Way' is a mistake. We
came home to the land of the
universal to correct the
dangers of the idea that one
home means one people."
The legacy of the Jews —
the stranger, the "other"in
history — is that the impor-
tant mitzvah is not to love
your neighbor as yourself,
but to love the stranger as
yourself, Hartman said.
"The other, the stranger, is
what humanizes history.
"We've come home to say
that in this land there is
room for the stranger. In this
land, two children can
receive a blessing.
"I've come home to offer a
new interpretation of what
monotheism is all about,"
Hartman said. "We can
listen to each others' music.
And not feel threatened." ❑

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

41

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