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November 17, 1989 - Image 147

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Hava Nedaber Ivrit:A Family Reunion In Israel

Each month in this space,
L'Chayim will present a Hebrew
lesson entitled, "Hava Nedaber
Ivrit!" (Let's Speak Hebrew), whose
aim is to encourage further study of
Hebrew. The lesson will include a
brief story utilizing the Hebrew
words to be studied, a vocabulary
list with English translations and a
family activitiy which involves using
the new words. The lessons will be
prepared by Nira Lev, associate
professor of Hebrew language and
literature at the Midrasha College of
Jewish Studies. Mrs. Lev also
teaches Hebrew language and
literature at the Community Jewish
High School at the United Hebrew
Schools.
Following is this month's
lesson:
"Mishpacha Gdolah" was
always my chalom when I was
growing up in Israel. Our
mishpacha was very small because
most of my krovim, my mother's
horim, achim and achayot, and
most of my father's krovim were
killed in Europe in the Shoah. As a
yalda ktana I always thought:
"Yesh lee mazal to have my saba
and savta (on my father's side) and
my beloved doda Rachel (on my
mother's side)." Doda Rachel, my
mother's young achot followed my
mother to Eretz Yisrael as a
chalutza and she and her family
were our closest mishpacha.
On the chagim, when all
mishpachot gather to celebrate the
chag together, I always felt the
tza'ar and the ke'ev of not having
harbe krovim. I often thought of all
the dodim, dodot, and b'ney
dodim that I could have had.
While emee knew ma kara to
her whole mishpacha, there was
some "mystery" that baffled both
avi and savi. Saba used to tell us
about his ach and achot who left
home in Russia with the matara
and tikvah of reaching either Eretz
Yisrael or the "Goldene Medinah."
The whereabouts of these ach and
achot were never known. My saba
never found out what happened to
them lamrot all his ma'amatzim
and this became a frequent noseh
in our seechot at home.
Several years after Milchemet
Ha-aatzmaut, avi, who was an
enginaer and a katzin in Tzahal,
was sent to Artzot Ha-brit to further
his studies. He lived in New York
and used to read the eton
b'Yiddish. He was especially
interested in the mador la'chaepus
krovim where people placed
moda'ot looking for krovim who
disappeared during the milchama.
Avi, the born optimist decided to
place a moda'ah looking for his long

lost dod and doda. He was told that
there is no tikva to find them but
after placing the moda'ah he waited
kol yom for a phone call bringing
him the b'sorah that one of his
krovim was found.
The long awaited b'sorah did
not come until he had already been
back ba'bait, in Israel. Our simcha
and hitragshoot cannot be
described. We learned that our
krovim did not read the eton
b'Yiddish and they heard about the
moda'ah from one of our uncle's
patients.
We found a mishpacha gdolah
living in New Jersey, and an intense
hitkatvoot followed. I was delighted
to use my newly acquired skills in
the English language and a real
chaveroot grew out of the
michtavim. Our krovim became
interested in Yisrael and came on a
bikkur for my son's brit.
Years later, when we came to
Artzot Habrit, they welcomed us like
horim chavim and so they have
treated us ever since. Being away
from our mishpacha krova in
Yisrael, they have been our
mishpacha. When they all came to
our son's Bar Mitzva, together with
kol ha-mishpacha from Yisrael, this
was the most exciting, beautiful

eechud mishapachot We have ever
attended.

Meelon (dictionary)

mishpacha
gdolah
chalom
krovim
horim
achim
achayot
Shoah
yalda
ktana
Yesh lee mazal
luck)
saba
mavta
doda
chalutza
chagim
chag
tza'ar
ke'ev
harbe
dodim
dodot
b'ney dodim
emes
ma kara
avi
savi
ach

family
big
dream
relatives
parents
brothers
sisters
holocaust
girl
little
.I am lucky (I have

grandfather
grandmother
aunt
pioneer
holidays
holiday
sorrow
pain
many
uncles
aunts
cousins
my mother
what happened
my father
my grandfather
brother

sister
achot
aim, goal, objective
matara
hope
tikva
The "Goldene Medinah"The Golden
Land (The U.S.A. in Yiddish)
inspite of
lamrot
efforts
ma'amatzim
subject
noseh
conversations
seechot
Milchemet Ha' atzmaut ..The War of
Independence
katzim officer
Tzahal ....The Israel Defense Army
the U.S.A.
Artzot Ha'brit
newspaper
eton
b'Yiddish
column in a newspaper
Mador
cheepus krovim . looking for relatives
mador le'cheepus krovim .. a column
in the paper where people look
for lost relatives. (especially after
the Second World War)
ads
Moda'ot
an ad
moda'ah
every day
kol yom
good news
b'sorah
joy
simcha
excitement
hitragshoot
correspondence
hitkatvoot
letters
michtavim
visit
bikkur
loving parents
horim chavim
eechood mishpachot family reunion

Desta's Journey

Directions: Follow the aleph-bet, all the way through tet, to help Desta, of Ethiopia, join her family in
Israel. Move one space up, down, right, left, or diagonally for each letter until you get Desta through the
maze. Warning: There may be a few detours along the way.

ANSWER ON
PAGE L-8

Puzz e by Judy Silberg Loebl

Desta is a fictional character. Her story can be found in the novel The Return, by Sonia Levitin. This book and others on the plight of Ethiopian Jews can be found at your

local library or bookstore.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

L-3

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