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November 03, 1989 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ENTERTAINMENT I

4TH ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL

Redst Yiddish?

FREE DESSERT NOV. 4

Continued from preceding page

COME IN AND ENJOY OUR GREAT FOOD!

THANK YOU FOR YOUR WONDERFUL SUPPORT!

COMPARE ANYWHERE! .... IF YOU WANT THE BEST — GIVE US A TEST!

DINE IN & CARRY-OUT AVAILABLE

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OPEN 7 DAYS-SUNAHURS 11.10

0)
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112

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JUST NORTH OF 10 MILE NEXT TO ZOO

544-1211

QUALITY AND CONSISTENCY IS OUR PRIORITY!

8

"PROBABLY THE WORST THING I EVER. DID"

"I hate to go out to dinner, period! I had a million excuses.
The food's no good. The food's good, but over-priced. The
food's o.k., but the place is too far. The food and music are
lousy. The service is horrible. Last week I ran out of excuses."

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ON FOOD PURCHASES
OF $6 OR MORE

Each Sunday 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

DINING ROOM, CARRY-OUT

$1495

Expires November 30, 1989

• BANQUET ROOMS • BEER • WINE
• COMPLETE CARRY-OUT • COCKTAILS

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Dine in Only • One Coupon Per Visit
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'With Coupon* Expires Dec. 31, 1989)

INCLUDES: STEAK FAJITA, 2 TACOS, CHEESE'
ENCHILADA, EL PADRE BURRITO, TOSTADA,
1
GUACAMOLE DIP, RICE AND BEANS.



Only
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With

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• Expires Dec. 31, 1989

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1989

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EMBASSY

SUITES
HOTEL

It

11.1

Serving Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Fri. 11 a.m.-12 Mid.
Sat. 2 p.m.-12 Mid., Sun. 4 p.m.-11 p.m.

70

355E2050

28100 Franklin Road
Southfield

Hebrew, has entertained most
of his 78 years but never earn-
ed a dime for it. Affectionate-
ly dubbed "Toastmaster
General of Metropolitan
Detroit," he entertains at
various events.
"You don't go to school to
become a humorist," he once
said. "You've got to like peo-
ple. Some fellas get a kick out
of making a hole-in-one. My
greatest joy is hearing an au-
dience laugh!'
Jewish humor, says Sosin,
has peculiarities only Jewish
people understand and ap-
preciate. Mamaloshen is
heimish and has a lighter side
which Sosin brings to his
admirers.
Musical director for the
review is Lillian Zellman
who's steeped in the nostalgia
and emotion of Yiddish
melody.
Zellman holds a Bachelor of
Music degree. She taught
piano for a number of years
and was an accompanist for
the Detroit Board of Educa-
tion. She has also directed
confirmations for Detroit-
area synagogues.
Zellman, who has long been
involved in programs in the
Jewish Community Center, is
enthused about the show; she
takes time from her busy
schedule to practice in-
dividually with members of
the cast.
Sylvia Halliburton, often
dubbed "The Yiddish Night-
ingale," is no stranger to Yid-
dish theater. She has ap-
peared on the Yiddish stage
in New York. As a teen, she
performed in the Catskill
Mountains.

The former radio and stage
personality sang at Orchestra
Hall in Chicago and the In-
stitute of Arts in Cleveland.
Halliburton also appeared
at Cobo Hall with Richard
Tucker, the Detroit Sym-
phony Ensemble and the
Jewish Center Theater and is
a former director of the Senior
Adult Choral Group at the
Center.
"I love Yiddish music, and
I truly believe there is a need
and a desire for its return to
the stage," Halliburton said.
"The Yiddish language has
no equal. It speaks volumes of
heartache and joy."

Phyllis Bratt is also excited
about the show; she'd be will-
ing to sing every part. She
has entertained for the
Jabotinsky Society, the Pin-
the Men's Club at Beth
Shalom, the Sisterhood of
Temple Emanu-El, National
Council of Jewish Women and
other civic groups.
Two years ago, Bratt did ex-
tensive research on the
late Irving Berlin and created

a show commemorating Ber-
lin's 100th birthday.
Irene Pianin, also in the
show, sang with the Oak Park
Civic Chorus and a local
opera workshop. Pianin per-
formed leading roles in
various operas presented by
the workshop and in Milk and
Honey produced by the Jewish
Community Center.
Sidney Mann says he plays
violin as a hobby. He studied
until the age of 12 and enjoys
practicing. He plays with the
Southfield Symphony.
"I love entertaining my
friends at the Jewish Com-
munity Center," he said.
"They're delightful people.
I'm having fun contributing
to Yiddish Theater, and I
know it will grow in this
area."
The heart of Detroit's Yid-
dish theatrical life was the
theater operated by Abraham
Littman through the late

There were always
crowds quarreling,
shoving, leaning
and elbowing
around the box
office.

1930s. Littman's was so much
a part of Detroit Jewish life
that it developed its own
traditions.
"On Saturday nights, the
theater would be only half
full five minutes before cur-
tain time," he said. But there
were always crowds quarrel-
ing, shoving, leaning and
elbowing around the box of-
fice. Littman's Theater per-
formed seven nights a week,
plus matinees on Saturdays,
Sundays and holidays.
Where did it all go? Accor-
ding to actress Celia Adler,
who was part and parcel of
the golden age of Yiddish
Theater, the young genera-
tion doesn't speak Yiddish
anymore.
Parents spoke Yiddish to
each other when they didn't
want the children to unders-
tand, Adler said. Grand-
parents tried hard to speak
English in order to
communicate.
"But as long as `hubbies'
were there, they spoke Yid-
dish," she said. "The `bubbies'
are gone. The theater is gone!'
Aaron and members of the
cast of Catskills aren't talking
about a one day stand, a one-
shot deal.
"After the first perfor-
mance, we're taking the show
on the road in the Detroit
are," Aaron said. "Yiddish is
the melody. of Jewish song.
For too long, we've been lack-
ing a forum for that
melody."



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