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November 03, 1989 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SOMERSET
CLEANERS

Same Day Service
Monday thru Saturday
No Extra Change

HELEN DAVIS

BEAUTIFULLY LAUNDERED AND FINISHED REG. 900

Same day shirt service available at these two locations: In Southfield,
Twelve Mile at Evergreen and Middlebelt at Northwestern Highway in
Farmington Hills.

WITH ANY INCOMING DRY CLEANING ORDER OF $6.95 OR MORE

-

ABSOLUTELY

-

IMM

-

FREE

I
I
I
I
I 1 PAIR OF PANTS
CLEANED AND PRESSED

L

with any incoming dry cleaning order of $6.95 or more. May
not be combined with any other coupon. Expires 12-2-89

SHEETS, PILLOW CASES
AND BACHELOR BUNDLES

• 8 lb. Minimum
• Beautifully laundered
and finished

Expires 12-2-89

THIS COUPON WORTH THIS COUPON WORTH

When presented with
any $6.95 incoming
dry cleaning order.
Coupon must be
surrendered when
leaving order for
procesing. Not valid
with any other coupon.

Expires 12-2-89

When presented with
any $6.95 incoming
dry cleaning order.
Coupon must be
surrendered when
leaving order for
procesing. Not valid
with any other couponl

L

Expires 12-2-89

I

• Suede & Leather Cleaning • Invisible Reweaving
• Alterations and Repairs
• Drapery Cleaning
• Executive Shirt Service
• Wedding Gowns
• Fur Cleaning

OPEN: Mon.

-

Fri. 7am - 7pm, Sat. 8am - 6pm

TROY 643-0807

2862 W. Maple (at Coolidge)

TROY 583-1574

5119 Rochester (at Long Lk. in Meadowbrook)

ROCHESTER 656-8544

1978 S. Rochester (at Hamlin)

BIRMINGHAM 644-6667

794 N. Woodward (4 blks. N. of Maple)

FRANKLIN 737-0721

LATHRUP VILLAGE 569-7440

26079 Southfield Rd. (at 10V2 Mile)

FARMINGTON HILLS 477-0818

25882 Middlebek (at 11 Mile)

FARMINGTON HILLS 474-2866

20417 W. 12 Mile Rd. (at Middlebett)

FARMINGTON HILLS 851-7665

31799 Middlebett (at Northwestern Hwy.)

IMENNE
VISA

32740 Franklin (3 biks. S. of Cider Mill)

SOUTHFIELD 559-9232

19715 W. 12 Mile Rd. (at Evergreen)

40

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1989

[ MasterCard

Nazi Hunters Pushing British
To Prosecute War Criminals

Foreign Correspondent

SHIRTS

r

BACKGROUND

merican-Israeli Nazi-
hunter Efraim Zuroff
is a man in a hurry.
There are so many more war
criminals to be tracked down
and so few years left in
which to bring them to
justice.
New names and new
evidence keep coming to
light, and Zuroff, Israel di-
rector of the Los Angeles-
based Simon Wiesenthal
Center, seethes with impa-
tience at the slow grinding of
the wheels of justice.
But for one day last week,
the former member of the
U.S. Justice Department's
Office of Special Investiga-
tions (OSI) allowed himself a
rare moment of satisfaction,
the opportunity to take a
back seat and watch others
run with the baton. It also
gave him the chance to
reflect on just how far he had
come in the fight to bring
Nazi criminals to trial.
Zuroff was in London to at-
tend, as an observer, a
meeting of the official war
crimes specialists from the
United States, Australia,
Canada and Britain.
A few years back, having
countries like Canada and
Australia actively pursue
and prosecute Nazis in their
midst seemed unlikely.
Zuroff recalls a conversa-
tion with an Australian
neighbor at his home in the
West Bank settlement of
Efrat: "I told him I had a list
of names of Nazi criminals
who had settled in Australia
and that the Wiesenthal
Center was going to submit
the list to the Australian
government.
"My neighbor's reaction
was to laugh. 'You don't
stand a chance in hell of get-
ting the Australians to do
anything about it,' he said."
Zuroff's neighbor was
wrong.
On the London podium is
the proof. There is Robert
Greenwood, director of the
Australian Special In-
vestigations Unit, who mov-
ed with such speed and pro-
fessional dedication that the
first trial of a war crimes
suspect who found refuge in
Australia is is expected to
get underway within a
matter of weeks.
Beside him is Bill-Hobson,
senior general counsel of the
Canadian Department of
Justice and head of the

Artwork from the Houston Chronicle by Bruce Oren. Copyright o 1989,
,
Houston Chronicle. Distributed by Los Angeles Times Syndicate.

Crimes Against Humanity
and War Crimes Unit. Hob-
son reported that the first
denaturalization trial has
just been completed in Van-
couver, while a full-scale
war crimes trial has opened
in Toronto.
The third member of the
panel is Neal Sher, veteran
director of the OSI, who has
undoubtedly accumulated
the most experience of all in
the business of Nazi-
hunting. Next to him sits the
latest recruit, Sir Thomas
Hetherington, who recently
headed an official commis-
sion of inquiry into war
crimes suspects in Britain.
The setting for this highly
unusual gathering is the
Royal Westminister Hotel in
London's Victoria district,
where the war crimes
specialists from around the
world have gathered to take
stock and compare notes.
There is, however, a
hidden agenda for the
meeting, which also draws
an impressive assortment of
British cabinet ministers,
politicians and international
legal experts.
Within the coming mon-
ths, British legislators will
be asked to decide whether
they support a proposal to
change the law in order to
enable British courts to try
Nazi war criminals who
found refuge in Britain after
the war.
The real purpose of the
meeting, therefore, is to
demonstrate that the United
States, Australia and
Canada have all taken this
path and that the skies have
not fallen in on them.
The British campaign to
bring war crimes suspects to
justice was sparked off when
the Wiesenthal Center, rely-

ing on Zuroff's detective
work, presented the British
government with the names
of 17 alleged war criminals
who had found sanctuary in
Britain immediately after
the war.
But it was not until a
Scottish Television _crew
traveled to the Soviet Union
and came home with a
wealth of documentary
evidence on one of the
suspects, who has lived
quietly in Edinburgh for
more than 40 years, that the
government finally was
prodded into action.
In unusually strong lan-
guage, the report noted "the
crimes committed are so
monstrous that they cannot
be condoned," and that
"there is sufficient evidence
to support criminal pro-
ceedings for murder against
some persons living in the
United Kingdom.
An official commission of
inquiry, headed by Sir
Thomas Hetherington,
Britain's former director of
public prosecutions, was es-
tablished to look into the
allegations and make ap-
propriate recommendations.
Last summer, after 17 mon-
ths of intensive investiga-
tion, Sir Thomas presented
the government with his
109-page report.
"The cases we investigated
disclose horrific instances of
mass murders," the report
said, "and we do not consider
the lapse of time since the
offenses were committed, or
the age of the offenders, pro-
vide sufficient reason for
taking no action."
The report added a curt
warning: "To take no action
would taint [Britain] with
the slur of being a haven for
war criminals."

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