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November 03, 1989 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CLOSE-UP

CD
WAREHOUSE

JUDITH EHRLICH

Continued from preceding page

GIGANTIC
INVENTORY
SALE!
Thursday, Nov. 1 - Wednesday, Nov. 8

ALL
CD'S

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CD'S

ALL
CD'S

OR LESS

(Mfg. List to $16.99)

Register To Win 10 FREE
Barbra Streisand CD's!!

BARBRA
STREISAND

ALL CD'S

GREXTEST KiTS
...XND MORE

$ 11 9- 9

including:

We're Not Makin'
Love Anymore

Woman In Love
Guilty
Someone Thal
I Used To Love

OR LESS

OR LESS

5_7k:

Elektra

7( 4 C. P

C

Geffen

C_ if 4 e 4 1A A)

_r

s

I

from CBS Records

ALL CD'S

COLLECTION

$ 11 99

-

ALL
CD'S

Island

Rickie Lee Jones

Flying Cowboys

Atlantic

MUSIC FROM THE EMMY AWARD•WINNING
SHOW AND ITS ERA

The

Featuring: Satellites • Don't Let The
Sun Cinch You Crying

WONDER YEARS

FI

INCLUDES

L-01,1

INCLUDES SUBCITY
ALL THAT YOU HAVE IS YOUR SOUL
A HUNDRED YEARS

CompactDisc

TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX
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DRIFT AWAY JUDSON SPENa-
IN THE STILL OF THE NIGHT
(I'LL REMEMBER) DEBBIE GIBSON

Guaranteed Lowest Prices in Town • We will not be undersold • Thousands
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JEANS • TOPS • SHIRTS
• JACKETS • DRESSES • PANTS • OUTFITS
BY WELL KNOWN MANUFACTURERS

CRUISE WEAR ARRIVING DAILY

COMPLAISANT

-

30

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1989

Kosins

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855-4464
Hunters Square • Farmington Hills

owned restaurants in
Detroit; his father-in-law
owned the posh Beverly
Hills Hotel.
"These were not the rags
to riches stories," Ehrlich
says.
Boseky is one of a few
black sheep in New Crowd,
which focuses primarily on
the success tales of in-
vestment chiefs, Felix
Rohatyn of Lazard Freres,
Sandy Weill of Shearson
Hayden Stone Inc. and John
Gutfreund of Solomon
Brothers. Weill is portrayed
as tough but sincere and
kind. Gutfriend, like
Boesky, is treated as a cold
businessman.
A few other Wall Street
investors made famous for
other reasons than success
join Boesky in New Crowd.
Drexel Burnham Lambert's
Michael Milken, once king of
junk bonds, now is awaiting
trial on a myriad of security-
law charges. And there is
mention of investment
banker Martin Siegel, who
provided inside information
to Boesky.
Corporate raiders Carl
Icahn, Saul Steinberg, Irwin
Jacobs and Ronald Perelman
also are major players of the
New Crowd.
New Crowd, which took
five years to complete, lived
through the insider trading
scandal and the stock
market crash of October
1987.
Boesky, Ehrlich says, was
interviewed five times at the
Harvard Club in New York
City. Each time, Boesky had
a press agent on hand to
greet the writers and offer
them gourmet meals.
Boesky was consistently 1
1/2 hours late. He was con-
trolling. He wouldn't allow
the writers to tape inter-
views, but his press agent
taped them for Boesky.
The authors haven't
spoken with Boesky since
his arrest and conviction,
but a mutual friend speaks
regularly with Boesky, who
has phone privileges.
"Boesky says he wants to
make another fortune — this
time the honest way."

IRA BERKOW

Continued from Page 29

of the bigger picture of
teamwork, of the opportuni-
ty to rise democratically on
sheer ability alone .. .and
(how) it was as tough to suc-
ceed in that game as it was
to succeed in the country at
large," Berkow says. He
agreed to take the job.
Sitting beside his pool,

Greenberg dictated his
memoirs. Transcribed, they
came out to about 700 pages.
Greenberg's son, Stephen,
passed them on to Berkow
for editing.
As Berkow read, he had
many questions, which he
passed to Stephen, who
spoke with his father. By
then, Hank Greenberg was
in the hospital dying of
cancer.
But Greenberg welcomed
the opportunity to work,
Berkow says. "Hank wanted
so much to finish this book
that his son says it actually
kept him alive an extra two
or three months."
In addition to editing the
Greenberg manuscript,
Berkow conducted numerous
interviews and researched
old newspaper clippings
about the baseball star. The
result is a- book filled with
some of the lesser-known
stories about Greenberg,
such as how he stayed home
from school on Halloween
because all the kids in the
Greenwich Village beat up
on the Jews, and the more
famous — like the time he
refused to play baseball on
Yom Kippur.
It was a difficult decision,
Berkow says. He knew his
fellow Jews wanted him to
sit the game out. He also
knew the fans and the team
were counting on him.
Two of Berkow's favorite
incidents in Hank Greenberg
center on two other baseball
greats Moe Berg and Jackie
Robinson.
Berg, who played with the
White Sox, was one of the
few Jews in baseball in the
1930s. "He was a good-
natured, good-looking guy,
and kind of mysterious,"
Greenberg wrote in his book.
"In later years we learned
that he worked as a spy for
the United States just before
and during the Second
World War."
Robinson was the first
black player in the major
leagues. In his book, he re-
membered playing against
Robinson and the Dodgers.
Many of Greenberg's
teammates were taunting
Robinson. "Hey, coal mine,
hey, coal mine, we're going
to get you!" they called.
"Jackie turned his ,head,"
Greenberg wrote. "He was
like a prince. He kept his
chin up and kept playing as
hard as he could. He was
something to admire that
afternoon."
Later, the two met at first
base. "Don't pay any atten-
tion to these Southern
jockeys," Greenberg told
Robinson. "They aren't wor-
th anything as far as you're

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