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October 28, 1989 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Robert Stern builds the
American dream with his
1.... magnificent designs.

CUL AT

BY CARLA JEAN SCHWARTZ

A

rchitect Robert A. M. Stern
grew up in Brooklyn, New
York, riding the subway and
believing the sign "To the
City" was meant for him personally.
As a teen he admired the magnifi-
cent skyscrapers and enjoyed visits to
the Metropolitan Museum of Art. His
young adult years were spent at Col-
umbia University where he received a
bachelor of arts degree before moving
on to Yale for a master's degree in
architecture.
"The city was my playground and
still is until this very day," says Stern.
Today, the 50-year-old architect
resides and works in Manhattan and
is at the helm of a 100-person name-
sake firm of architects, interior
designers and landscape designers.
His playground still may be the city
where he has published books on New
York architecture, but his horizons have
definitely expanded.
Robert Stern is one of America's
premier architects, his designs interna-
tionally celebrated. Not only does his
work span the globe but it spans the
private, corporate, university and
public world as well. Some of his most
recent projects include: the head-
quarters for Mexx International Inc. in
The Netherlands, the Center for Jewish

38

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Life at Princeton University, the Nor-
man Rockwell Museum in Stock-
bridge, Mass., and a new library for St.
Paul's School in Concord, N.H.
During President George Bush's re-
cent Eastern European visit, he men-
tioned on national television the con-
struction of The America House, an ad-
ditional facility to the United States Em-
bassy in Budapest, Hungary, and he
noted that the architect was Robert
Stern.
In 1986 Stern hosted the aptly titled
"Pride of Place: Building the American
Dream," an eight-part television series
on American architecture aired on the
Public Broadcasting System.
He and his firm, which generated
$75 million in construction revenues in
1988, according to Millionaire
magazine, have received prestigious
awards, including the Medal of Honor
of the American Institute of Architects
New York chapter.
Stern wears several hats in his field.
In addition to designing, he is a writer,
lecturer and teacher. Since 1982 he
has been a professor at the graduate
school of architecture at Columbia
University, a position he says he enjoys
and believes is his obligation as a pro-
fessional. His lectures and writing are
inspirational reference materials for ar-

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