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October 27, 1989 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

Bay Area Jews Help
Selves, Others Recover

PEGGY ISAAK GLUCK

Special to The Jewish News

A

fter brushing off the

dust of the Oct. 17
devastating 7.1 ear-
thquake here, the Jewish
community of San Francisco
has moved quickly not only
to restore normalcy to their
own institutions, but to
reach out and help their en-
tire community recover.
On Tuesday, a week after
the earthquake struck, rep-
resentatives of the San
Francisco-based Jewish
Community Federation
presented a check for
$250,000 to the Red Cross.
Those needing relief in-
cluded members of the
Jewish community. In San
Francisco's Marina District,
between 40 and 50 Jewish
households were declared
unsafe and their residents
temporarily homeless.
The Jewish Family &
Children's Services is work-
ing to relocate the Jewish
families and individuals left
homeless to temporary
quarters. Scores of people
have called the agency to
offer housing.
One synagogue, Temple
Emanu-El in San Francisco,
had to house its own rabbi
and cantor. Rabbi Gayle
Pomerantz and Cantor
Roslyn Barak, both
residents of the Marina
District, had their homes
damaged in the earthquake
and stayed with congregants
who volunteered their
homes as temporary
shelters.
Fortunately, Jewish in-
stitutions, with only a few
exceptions, emerged from
the quake relatively un-
damaged.
The San Francisco-based
Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council inspected
synagogues around the Bay
Area. "Damage as far as we
can ascertain is minimal,"
said Jerry Isaak-Shapiro,
assistant director of the
agency. "In that way, we are
quite lucky."
Some Jewish organiza-
tions, however, did not share
in that luck. A landmark
building in Oakland that
contained the offices of
United Synagogue of
America and Young Judaea
has been condemned, and
both organizations have
been temporarily relocated
to private homes.
In San Francisco, a
workshop operated by

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Jewish Family and
Children's Services was con-
demned and the Jewish
Community Library suffered
extensive damage.
At the Home for Jewish
Parents, staff and residents
mourned a loss of life;
Anamafi Kalousa Moala, 23,
a part-time certified nursing
assistant at the home, was
apparently the only person
killed on the Bay Bridge the
day of the quake.
In addition to offering fi-
nancial help, Jewish groups
and individuals are pitching
into the general relief effort
in a variety of ways.
Teen-age members of San
Francisco B'nai B'rith Girls
went door-to-door to homes
and stores collecting several
truckloads of food and
clothing which were
delivered to the Salvation
Army on Sunday.
Local members of B'nai
B'rith and B'nai B'rith
Women, in the throes of the
organizations' annual drive
for the homeless, are now
donating clothing, sleeping
bags and blankets to victims
of the earthquake.
The San Francisco Jewish
Community Center opened
its doors to earthquake vic-
tims, providing them with
hot showers and hot meals
plus support groups to deal
with emotional problems.
Congregation Sherith
Israel, the historic
synagogue which withstood
the 1906 earthquake, had
some new faces in its
building this week.

The freshman and
sophomore classes of
neighboring St. Rose Acad-
emy resumed their studies
in the synagogue, after their
own building suffered exten-
sive earthquake damage.

"I think in times of crisis
such as this, all of us,
whatever religion or race,
should be reaching out to
one another. That's been the
spirit of the Quake of '89.
Sherith Israel is pleased that
we can help our neighbors
immediately," said Rabbi
Martin Weiner, whose board
ok'd the temporary housing
arrangement with no hesita-
tion.
All through the communi-
ty, the simple question ask-
ed repeatedly since last the
earthquake has been:
"Where were you?" The an-
swers to that question rang-
ed from the hair-raising to
the amusing.



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3

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