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October 20, 1989 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIGHT

-

Pop Culture

Continued from preceding page

Chairman of the Israeli
Broadcasting Authority, and
is a member of the Likud's
Central Committee. "They
are excluded by the leftists
who control the cultural and
journalistic establishment
here. In the past few years,
there hasn't been a single
novel published here that
reflects my political point of
view. There hasn't been a
single play. And yet, there are
a million Israelis who think
and vote as I do. You can't tell
me that none of them write."

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Although Israel's state
television is headed by Aryeh
Mekel, a former aide to Likud
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, Kor sees it as a whol-
ly left-wing institution. "I
doubt that there is a single
Likud voter among the entire
staff," he says. "And the
results are obvious. The only
television movies they put on
are about Jewish women who
fall in love with Arab men.
Would we show a film about
good settlers fighting Palesti-
nian terrorists? I hate to say
this, but its very, very ques-
tionable."

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Iconoclastic Man Ray:
A Multi-Media Master

DAVID M. MAXFIELD

Special to The Jewish News

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36

Hawks also suspect that
there is a left-wing conspiracy
to punish artists who stray
from establishment or-
thodoxy. "A few years ago,
Zvika Pik publicly endorsed
the Likud," says a Likud
member of Knesset. "He was
a giant rock star at the time.
And suddenly, no more perfor-
mances at kibbutzim, hardly
any airtime for his records —
and he more or less disap-
peared. If you don't think that
sent a message, you're crazy."
Doves deny that there is a
conspiracy to repress right-
wing art. "Its no secret that
the great majority of those
who decide what will be pro-
duced and what won't are left
wingers," says Michael
Handelzaltz. "Still, they don't
censor plays. They care, first
and foremost, about selling
tickets, and they look for good
commercial products."
Handelzaltz believes that
the trend in Israeli culture is
in any case, away from poli-
tical subjects. "The theater is
already tired of politics," he
says. "Writers are now turn-
ing to more' personal sub-
jects." ❑

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1989

F

rom his own fabri-
cated futuristic name
to the ways he viewed
and interpreted the world in
his varied art, Man Ray was,
in a phrase, an explorer of
ideas.
Never satisfied with ap-
pearances during his 86 years
— to Man Ray things were
never what they seemed —
the American artist's
creativity defies categoriza-
tion, encompassing as it did
photography, painting, film,
object making, commercial
design and even fashion ads.
Yet his work, pursued first in
New York City, later in Paris
and Los Angeles, never failed
to reflect his innate curiosity
and sense of freedom.
A major traveling exhibi-
tion, "Perpetual Motif: The
Art of Man Ray," organized by
the National Museum of
American Art in Washington,
D.C., re-evaluates the career
of this artist whose legacy,
one contemporary critic con-
tends, lets us assume that
"art can be made of anything
and out of anything."
Philadelphia-born in 1890
as Emmanuel Radnitsky
("Manny" to his Russian im-
migrant parents), the grown-

up, multi-media master held
a leading but never type-cast
role in the perhaps not-so-
Lost Generation, the fabled
1920s crowd that found Paris
welcoming, accepting and
stimulating to their work.
The City of Light sheltered
an international cast — the
likes of Pablo Picasso, Ernest
Hemingway, James Joyce,
Marcel Duchamp, Salvadore
Dali and Gertrude Stein — all
of them coming and going
and from time to time posing
for Man Ray's penetrating
portrait camera. Open to
many new, and not a few wild
ideas following World War I,
the city was an ideal
workshop for this ambitious,
highly talented and above all
iconoclastic Man Ray (never
Mr. Ray) who had declared at
a very early age: "I shall from
now on do the things I am not
supposed to do."
Photography became Man
Ray's medium of opportunity,
allowing him to lead
something of a career double-
life: His portraits paid the
bills, providing the means for
provocative work that kept
him at the forefront of the
avant-garde in Paris.
Photography in his day was
something of a stepchild in
the art world, a sharp con-
trast to its place now as the

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