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October 20, 1989 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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16

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1989

Fresh Air

Continued from Page 1

leaving his post as director
of outdoor education in
December. Also, Associate
Director Lewis Hamburger
remains in his position and
becomes Camp Maas direc-
tor; and Elliot Sorkin,
formerly development direc-
tor, becomes director of ad-
ministration, leaving en-
dowment responsibilities to
Fisher.
Harlene Appelman,
formerly director of the
Jewish Experiences For
Families, which is run by
the Fresh Air Society, has
been promoted to director of
family planning. Part-time
staff members will run
summer camp.
A key change, Fisher said,
is the new marketing posi-
tion. In this role, Metz will
be responsible for camp
recruitment from smaller
Michigan and out-of-state
communities as well as
planning education pro-
grams, Fisher said. Some
targeted communities are
Flint, Lansing, Grand
Rapids, Toledo, other parts
of Ohio and Indiana.

Summer camp now at-
tracts between 1,400 and
1,500 youngsters. Potential-
ly, Fisher said, the Orton-
vine and Brighton facilities
could house 1,700 campers.
As part of its quest to
better serve members of the
Jewish community, Fresh
Air last month hired Mar-
riott Corp. to develop a
marketing plan to boost oc-
cupancy at the Butzel Con-
ference Center at Camp
Maas in Ortonville.
The partnership with Mar-
riott, which already
manages Fresh Air Society's
kosher food service, aims to
increase revenues by attrac-
ting more small business
and professional groups dur-
ing the week to the con-
ference center, which is
booked most weekends
throughout the year.
Surplus funds for Fresh
Air Society ventures would
be put back into the camp to
cut costs, provide scholar-
ships and improve grounds
and buildings, Fisher
said.



Agency Will Oversee
Soviet Cultural Programs

KIMBERLY LIFTON

Staff Writer

T

he Jewish Welfare
Federation's board of
governors next week
is expected to select a local
Jewish agency to develop
and oversee cultural pro-
grams for Soviet emigres.
Several agencies, including
Jewish Experiences For
Families, the Jewish Com-
munity Center, and the
Lubavitch Foundation, have
submitted proposals to the
Federation outlining their
plans to reach out to Soviet
Jews.
"We want to provide
throughout our system more
opportunities for Soviet
emigres as American Jews,"
said Federation Planning
Director Larry Ziffer. "We
do not have an effective
means to do so.
"We will not put all pro-
gramming responsibilities
under the auspices of one
agency," Ziffer said. "This
will be one level of outreach
on a broader scale. We are
looking for innovative
Jewish programming from
an institutional structure."
Detroit is expecting 600
refugees to settle here
through June 1990 —double
the recent projections and
three times the number of
initial estimates.

Financial assistance for
new immigrants from
Jewish Welfare Federation
allocations, unused funds
from the Allied Jewish
Campaign, the Passage to
Freedom resettlement cam-
paign and reimbursements
from the federal government
through programs ad-
ministered by the Hebrew
Immigrant Aid Society and
the Council of Jewish Fed-
erations, the umbrella
organization for federations
in North America.
BIAS helps emigrants get
from the Soviet Union t o the
United States. Local agen-
cies in Detroit, and most
other cities, offer assistance
once they settle in their new
communities. Among the
agencies helping the new
immigrants are Resettle-
ment Services, which assists
the immigrants in finding
housing and provides
counseling; Jewish Voca-
tional Service, which aids
their job searches; the
Jewish Community Center,
which offers cultural pro-
grams; and Jewish Family
Services, which provides
volunteers who teach
English.
Ziffer said the Federation
is prepared to provide in-
creased funds for the agency
selected for the additional
responsibility. Specific

_

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