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September 22, 1989 - Image 77

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Dressing Up For Rosh Hashanah

Each month in this space,
L'Chayim will present a Yiddish
lesson entitled, "Du Redst Yiddish?
(Do You Speak Yiddish?)," whose
aim is to encourage further study of
Yiddish. The lesson will include a
brief story utilizing the Yiddish
words to be studied, a vocabulary
list with English translations and a
family activity which involves using
the new words. Two books which
may be helpful for beginning
Yiddish students are Yiddish for
Beginners by Dr. Joffen and Der
Yiddisher Lerer by Goldin.
Weinreich's English-Yiddish
Dictionary also may be useful. At
the conclusion of each lesson will
be a suggested list of books for
persons who wish to further their
knowledge.

, The lessons were prepared by
Mary Koretz of Oak Park. She has
taught both children's and adult
classes in Yiddish at the Workmen's
Circle.

Following is this month's
lesson:
Once upon a time, ayder the
population of the farayniken shtetn,
suffered the addiction of mall

felt

hopping. Jews generally bought
clothes tsvay mol a year.
The tseit of the purchases were
Rosh Hashanah and Passover.
Clothes for herbst and winter would
be eingekoyft at Rosh Hashanah
and friling and zumer garb were
acquired at Passover. The gantse
family would be outfitted at
azelcherne times. Somehow, this
tetikeit lent an additional frayd to
the holiday.
Some time was spent happily
planning the outfits. The list
included pasik kostiumen, hemder,

knipungen, shich, zokn, mantlen

and klayder. The list also included
hit and hentshekes, which are
frequently omitted nowadays.
Then came the excursions to
the kromen. Because the event was
not a tegliche one or even a weekly
or monthly one, it was marked mit
groys excitement.
When Rosh Hashanah finally
arrived Jewish gegntin became
yomtovdik with the look of old
neighbors in new clothes.
Sometimes when the holiday hot
ongekumen, so did Indian zumer
and all the new finery were
inappropriate for the veter. That did

not change the plans for dress. The
weather was not as vichtik as the
holiday. One went to shul sei vee
sei. The synagogue did not have a
luftkiler. This was the pre-air
conditioning period. Were they
bakem? Who would notice when
they faced a neie yor with new
hope and new dresses.

Vocabulary

ayder
farayniken
shtetn
tsay mol
tseit
herbst
eingekoyft
friling
gants
tseitn
tetikeit
frayd
pasik

before
united
states
two times
time
autumn
purchased
spring (season)
whole, entire
times (plural)
activity
joy
suitable

kostiumen
hemder
knipugen
shich
zokn
mantlen
klayder
hit
hentshekes
kormen
tegliche
mit
groys
gegntin
yomtovdik
hot ongekumen
zumer
veter
vichtik
shul
sei vee sei
luftkiler
bakvem
neie
yor

clothes
shirts
ties
shoes
stockings, socks
coats
dresses
hats
gloves
stores
daily
with
great,large
neighborhoods
festive
arrived
summer
weather
important
synagogue
anyway
air conditioned
comfortable
new
year

Send Letters Of Support
To Soviet Refusenik Family

One way to learn about Jewish
life around the world is to write to a
Jewish family in another country.
Cost of an international air mail
letter is 45 cents per half ounce.
This month, the address of a
Russian Jewish refusenik has been
made available by the Soviet Jewry
Committee of the Jewish
Community Council.
This month's refusenik family is
that of Anatoly and Galina Genis.
The Genises are both
mathematicians and physicists.
Genis received his doctorate
from the faculty of mathematics at
Moscow University, but has been
unable to find work in his field since
applying for a visa. Mrs. Genis was
graduated from the Teacher's
Institute at Moscow University and
is unemployed.
Since 1980, Mrs. Genis has
suffered from Diancephal syndrome,
showing signs of severe depression,
pain in the heart region and
insomnia. Not only does this
condition prevent her from holding a
job, but she is unable to care for
her children.

Peter, the Genises' eldest son,
has Cushing's disease, causing him
to have high blood pressure and
periods of fatigue. He was not
conscripted into the Soviet Army
because of his illness and attends
medical school.
Soviet authorities claim that the
family cannot leave because Genis
learned "secrets" while .working as
an engineer at the Electro-
Mechanics Institute from 1970 to
1973, despite the fact the director of
the institute has often traveled to
the West.
Genis has participated in many
demonstrations and has been
harassed and beaten by the police.

BOOKS

A Homecoming, by Ephraim Sidon. Take Care Of Me, by
Chana Rivka Jacobs. The Jewish Holiday Book, illustrated by
Martin Lemelmen. First Fast, by Barbara Cohen. Color Me
Happy, a Rosh Hashanah Yom Kippur coloring book by Nor-
man Geller. All available at Borenstein's. Tamar's Sukkah, by

Ellie Gellman. A Rosh Hashanah Walk, by Carol Levin.

Sneakers To Shul, by Zephyrr Cooper. All available at Spitzer's.

VIDEO CASSETTES

"The Sabbath," a Gesher learning kit. "The Twin Jackets,"
stories performed by Yitzi Erps. At Borenstein's. "Tales Of In-
spiration," Torah Communications Network. Available at
Spitzer's.

TOYS AND GAMES

I Won A Mitzvah. At Spitzer's. Mishkan Monopoly. At
Borenstein's.

The Genises recently divorced in
the hope that Mrs. Genis and the
children could apply separately for
visas. The Genises, who both speak
English, have been refused exit
visas more than 25 times.

Letters of support may be sent
as follows: USSR, RSFSR, Moscow
121352, Bul. Slavyansky 5-1-104,
Genis, Anatoly.

Spitzer's is located at 21770 W. 11 Mile, Southfield.
Borenstein's is located at 25242 Greenfield, Oak Park.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

L-3

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