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September 22, 1989 - Image 39

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

QAr ciftfor

terests and were supporting
the Israeli occupation. Aline
retortedthat she was helping
the Palestinians to cope with
their new situation.
However, the Latin
patriarch in Jerusalem, Mon-
signor Gori, condemned the
activities at the convent.
Aline was replaced as
Mother-Superior and died in
1971 at age 60 of a heart at-
tack. The ulpan had grown
too large for the premises;
and so in 1972-73, it moved to
the new Martin Buber In-
stitute at the Mount Scopus
campus of the Hebrew
University.
Over the years, Yaron and
the other teachers have forg-
ed firm friendships with in-
numerable Palestinian
students. One of them is
Dadu Haron, who is now liv-
ing in Finland. _
In a letter to Yaron, Haron
commented on the hang-
glider attack in Galilee,in
which a PLO suicide attacker
killed six Israeli soldiers: "I
must tell you that I felt pro-
ud when the Palestinian flew
to Israel and killed some
Israeli soldiers, and at the
same time I hoped that your
children were not there." Yet,
he adds in the same letter:
"In the middle of the conflict,
the ulpan became special .. .
If I had stayed in Jerusalem,
I could have been standing
beside you and we might have
created big powerful groups

and 'fight' with the weapon of
love and understanding."
Says Sister Rose Therese,
"We have had Palestinians
who did not take part in any
of the extracurricular ac-
tivities at first. When I ask-
ed them why they wanted to
learn Hebrew, they would rep-
ly: to be able to fight my
enemy better. They did not at-
tend the tea-breaks, so as not
to have to talk to Israelis. By
the end of the trimester, they
would be asking me how to
organize bus trips to
kibbutzim.
"They still demand self-
determination, but they are
much more objective about
the conflict. It is significant
that most of the Arab par-
ticipants in the last two
courses asked for a Jewish
teacher, rather than an
Israeli Arab. They didn't want
any translation into Arabic.
"Most of those who come to
the courses are tired of the
present violence," the sister
said. "Some say the great
powers ought to step in and
provide a solution. Most of
our students say they do not
agree with rioting as a
method."
Kalmon Yaron insists that
the teachers never indulge in
propaganda or indoctrination.
"Anything that smacks of the
patronizing, we avoid like the
plague," he says. "Our ap-
proach is to respect the in-
dividual and his culture."

Rags To Riches Tale:
Tel Aviv Getting Cable

NECHEMIA MEYERS

Special to The Jewish News

T

elevision viewers in
the 'Ibl Aviv area will
be going from rags to
riches when Israel's first
cable TV service begins
operating there this fall.
Hitherto, they have had ac:
cess to just one channel, or a
handful if they happened to
have the proper reception con-
ditions and aerials. Now, like
their counterparts in the
United States they will be
able to choose from two dozen
channels.
A half-dozen competing
companies have been award-
ed franchises for one or more
of the 31 areas into which the
country has been divided.
These companies are partner-
ships between Israeli and
overseas firms. The latter —
which can hold no more than
49 percent of the shares —
bring with them both invest-
ment capital and cable TV ex-
perience from the U.S. or
Western Europe.

In order to ensure that all
parts of Israel have access to
the new service, franchise
areas pair together a realtive-
ly wealthy, densely populated
district with a poorer, sparse-
ly populated one. Thus the
company that will serve the
residents of North Tel Aviv
will hold serve Jezre'el Valley
farmers, and the one that
holds the franchise for Bat
Yam, a suburb of ribl Aviv, will
likewise bring cable TV to
Kiryat Shmoneh, a develop-
ment town on the Lebanese
border that was a terrorist
target for many years.
Subscribers will be charged
some • $150 for their initial
hookup as well as a $25 per
month subscription fee. In
return, they will have access
to local TV and a variety of
foreign stations. Not to be in-
cluded, however, are stations
deemed hostile to Israel,
which will presumably rule
out most Arab telecasts.
The newest films from any
country, however, will not be
screened on regular channels.

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