100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

September 08, 1989 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIDE WASHINGTON

DETROIT'S
HIGHEST
RATES

Minimum Deposit of $500
12 MONTH CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT

8.500%
8.775%*

Effective Annual Yield*

Compounded Quarterly.

This is a fixed rate account that is insured
to $100,000 by the Savings Association In-
surance Fund (SAIF). Substantial Interest
Penalty for early withdrawal from cer-
tificate accounts. Rates subject to
change without notice.

FIRST
SECURITY
SAVINGS
BANK FSB
MAIN OFFICE
PHONE 338.7700
1760 Telegraph Rd.
(Just South of Orchard Lake)
352.7700

OUAl Housmc
OPPORTUNITY

28

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1989

HOURS:
MON.-THURS.
9:30-4:30
FRI.
9:30-6:00

r"--

Vote For Pepper's Successor
Gets Mixed Reviews In Miami

JAMES D. BESSER

Washington Correspondent

I

n an otherwise dull
month, last week's
election to fill the con-
gressional seat held by the
late Claude Pepper for 26
years provided some badly
needed relief.
In a race marked by voting
along ethnic lines, Ileana Ros-
Lehtinen, the Republican
nominee, defeated Gerald F.
Richman, a Jewish lawyer.
In the ethnic hothouse of
Miami, Ros-Lehtinen
garnered 90 percent of the
Cuban-American vote;
Richman received almost all
of the Jewish vote and some
96 percent of the black vote.
"An uncomfortable positive
came out of this," said
William A. Gralnick,
Southeast regional director

for the American Jewish
Committee. "For the first
time in a long time, you had
a race where blacks and Jews
came together in a coalition.
The problem is that while
most of the blacks who voted
voted for Richman, the reali-
ty is that black registration
and black voting is not what
it should be."
The race, Gralnick said,
took on some anti-Semitic
overtones, specially on the
Spanish language radio
stations.
"What went on in that
medium was something that's
very difficult to digest in the
American politics — people
screaming that Richman was
a communist, that he was
part of a Jewish conspiracy to
keep Hispanics out of
politics."
Jewish
activists
in
Washington displayed mixed

feelings about the election.
Ros-Lehtinen recently made a
one-day trip to Israel to
establish her credentials as a
supporter of the Jewish state.
In a conversation with a
leading pro-Israel activist,
the new member of Congress
suggested that she intended
to become "the pro-Israel
voice of the Hispanic com-
munity," a prospect that
pleases Israel's supporters
here.
Multi-issue Jewish groups
are less enthusiastic. Ros-
Lehtinen, a conservative
Republican, is a strong oppo-
nent of legalized abortion.
And some Jewish activists
see dangerous portents in the
apparent breakup of the
broad ethnic coalition of
blacks, Jews and Hispanics
that the venerable Pepper
had maintained for several
decades.

Jews Plan Strategy
To Block Arafat Visit

Pro Arab organizations and
officials in the Bush ad-
ministration are playing a
quiet cat-and-mouse game
over the rumored attempt by
PLO chairman Yassir Arafat
to visit New York at the end
of the month to address the
United nations.
"We believe we understand
the administration's strategy
in this," said an official with
a major Arab American
organization. "The question
before us is, do we play into
their strategy? It is very com-
plicated."
The administration, accor-
ding to this source, is hoping
that Arafat will apply both
for a visa for the U.N. visit
and a visa to address an Arab-
American group in another
city.
"That way, they can avoid
some of the fallout from mak-
ing a decision to bar him or a
decision to admit him," this
source said.
Jewish
groups
in
Washington appear to be
united in their opposition to
an Arafat visit, but unsure of
the best way to pursue the
issue when official
Washington re-opens after its
long summer recess.
"I think there is a tremen-
dous amount of soul sear-
ching going on," said
Shoshana Bryen, director of
the Jewish Institute for Na-
tional Security Affairs (JIN-
SA). "I think the Jewish
groups realize that there are

implications to this decision
that go well beyond the
specific issue of a visa:'
The administration is fac-
ing the dilemma that a rejec-
tion of an Arafat visa request
would be an indirect admis-
sion that the dialogue with
the Palestine Liberation
Organization has failed to
produce results. Foreign
policy planners remain divid-
ed on the question of whether
the unproductive talks in
Tunis can be turned around —
and therefore, divided on the
question of how to respond to
an Arafat visa application.
Jewish groups that held
back on opposition to the US-

PLO dialogue last December
appear to be moving in the
direction of admitting that
the talks have been a failure,
a movement that accelerated
with the recent Fatah Con-
gress. This, _ a number of
observers suggest, will tend
to work for a unified and
vocal opposition to an Arafat
visa.
"There is a lot of soul sear-
ching going on," said
Shoshana Bryen, who per-
sonally favors a public fight to
oppose the granting of a visa.
"You can't look at Arafat's
visa in a vacuum. There's
cause and effect all over the
place."

Child Care Bill Raises
Church-State Questions

As Congress wends its way
'back to Capitol Hill after its
summer frolics, the issue of
comprehensive child-care
legislation is laying in wait,
ready to entangle legislators
and Jewish activists alike in
new church-state
controversies.
Last month, some Jewish
groups that played a pivotal
role in the Act for Better
Child Care were dismayed
when the Senate passed a
modified version of the bill
that would allow child-care
vouchers to be used for
religious purposes at day care
facilities.

Now, attention has shifted
to the House, where a dif-
ferent child-care proposal will
be at the top of the agenda in
September. Initially, the
Child Development and
Educational Act provided an
expansion of existing pro-
grams, including Head Start
and an expansion of school-
based child care facilities. The
bill, sponsored by Rep.
Augustus Hawkins, D-Calif.,
also included provisions
against the use of federal
money for sectarian purposes.
But Rep. Tom Downey, D-
N.Y.,is pushing for changes
that would replace the major

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan