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September 08, 1989 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Continued from preceding page

what they want to show, and
I would do the handwork, ac-
tually painting it."
Like Factor and Lubin,
Cutler has his work printed
in several medical journals
and books.
All three medical il-
lustrators said they are con-
tent in their careers and en-
joy the challenge that comes
with the job.
"I think it's challenging
because every time a physi-
cian comes to you, as well as
you know the anatomy or as
much as you've learned about
surgery through the years,
you always learn something
new because they're coming
to you as an expert in a very
specific field," Factor said.
"And my knowledge of
anatomy is very general, so I
get to see a quick study in a
lot of different areas, drawing
for eye surgery, heart surgery,
abdominal surgery, obstetrics
and gynecological surgery.
"Although the job is
challenging, it does have its
downside," he continued.
"Juggling 10 clients can be
tiring because you have to
bend over the drawing board

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eight hours a day. You have to
make every minute count. My
neck and back are frequently
sore."
Cutler said, "The nice thing
about this job is that I get to
work in a lot of different
media; I get to paint; I get to
draw; I get to sculpt; and I get
to study the human anatomy
in the operating room and the
morgue?'
To Lubin, the job is always
challenging because she has
to take somebody's thoughts
and ideas and draw them.
"A photograph of a surgical
site is a messy situation with
blood, fat and tissue," she
said. "You can't clearly see
what's going on, so the
medical illustrator cleans it
up. I love the challenge."
Lubin admitted there aren't
any things she dislikes about
the job. With four small
children, she finds it conve-
nient to work out of her home
and does the jobs she likes,
trying to avoid illustrating
charts and graphs, the
mechanical form of drawing.
"I enjoy art and feel
privileged to get paid for do-
ing this."



I NEWS I

Georgia Shul Gets OK
To Build Despite Foes

RICHARD BONO

Special to The Jewish News

A

Reform congregation
was granted govern-
ment approval last
week to build the first
synagogue in suburban
Gwinnett County, ending
temporarily a six-year
dispute in which some local
residents were accused of
anti-Semitism in their pro-
tests over the construction of
the shul.
The Gwinnett County Com-
mission voted unanimously
Aug. 22 to approve a zoning
variance that clears the way
for the temple's construction
near Snellville, Ga., 25 miles
from Atlanta and three miles
from the national head-
quarters of the Ku Klux Klan
in Stone Mountain.
The county commission
vote was based on the recom-
mendation of Gwinnett's
Planning Commission, which
gave its approval seven days
before.
At that time, a handful of
residents from the
neighborhood where the
synagogue's construction was

Richard Bono is a reporter for our
sister publication, the Atlanta
Jewish Times.

proposed vocally objected. The
language and manner with
which they made their com-
ments caught the attention of
the country, as news organiza-
tions from coast to coast
reported the event.
One of the six people who
claim to live near the McGee
Road site where the proposed
temple would be built said
she objected to the "strange
people" Beth David would
bring to the neighborhood.
Another questioned why
Jews would even want to
build "a church" in an area
where there are no Jews.
Vocal opposition at the
planning commission hearing
came two years after a sign
announcing the "future site
of Temple Beth David" was
defaced with swastikas and
Nazi "SS" symbols. At that
time, public officials in Gwin-
nett, Christian clergy and
others condemned the act.
Pat Garmon, a Snellville
resident who opposes con-
struction of the shul, read a
list of six objections that she
said pertained only to the
legality of the zoning issue
before the commission.

"We have no objection to
anyone's religion, nationality
or color or anything to do
with that," she said. ❑

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