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September 01, 1989 - Image 75

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FLORAL ARRANGING CLASSES

Talk to your child's teacher
and compare notes. Is the
child working to his or her
potential in class? Are the
assignments being complet-
ed? What is the nature of the
homework assigned? Is it
work that hasn't been com-
pleted in class or drill work?
Homework problems can
also be symbolic of other prob-
lems. "Some children lie
about homework because
they are overwhelmed and
are trying to cover up;
sometimes they feel like a
failure before they even
begin," says Tisdale: `Some

"More homework
is not necessarily
better," says a
recent study at
Johns Hopkins
University.

problems
stem from
unrealistic expectations
parents or teachers have of
the child?'
If problems persist, Tisdale
recommends having a trained
educational/clinical psycholo-
gist evaluate the child's
achievement as compared to
his or her potential.
Tisdale says a thorough
evaluation should include a
battery of intelligence and
achievement tests, an infor-
mal interview with the par-
ents and a separate interview
with the child. For children
ages 4 to 6 there would be ap-
proximately three 45-minute
testing sessions; for older chil-
dren, approximately five ses-
sions.
"I try to make the testing
as fun and low key as possible,
with lots of breaks, hot
chocolate and prizes," Tisdale
says.

If tutoring is indicated,
Tisdale says the child should
be referred to individuals who
are effective teachers and
have a proven track record
working with students. "I shy
away from franchised learn-
ing centers where you have no
control over who will be tutor-
ing your child: she says.
Bernard Mazer, a school
administrator, says he, too, is
leary of national chains that
guarantee a child's math or
reading level will improve one
level within a certain amount
of time. "They give the child
a pre-test and then tutor him
for the- post-test, rather than
working on study skills or
learning problems:' he says.
Mazer employs only certi-
fied teachers as tutors and
has an educational psycholo-
gist and school psychologist
on staff. His study skill center
offers tutoring in all subjects

,

for school age children, in-
cluding bar/bat mitzvah
tutoring and preparation for
college boards.
"We invite parents in for an
initial conference and expect
to see them every two weeks
to encourage their close con-
tact," he says. ❑

Effective Help

1. Find a consistent time for
homework.
Set a time for homework
that takes into account when
your child is most productive
and when you are available to
help. Be sure your child's
after-school schedule is free
enough to have energy left
over for homework.
2. Be sure the work environ-
ment is reasonably quiet.
Help your child concentrate
by removing all temptations.
Television, radio and
telephone calls can wait until
homework is complete. Don't
-be afraid to set reasonable
limits that are consistently
enforced.
3. Provide a desk, lamp and
all necessary supplies.
Many children work very
nicely sprawled out on the
bed or floor, but even
preschoolers enjoy having
their very own work space fill-
ed with crayons, scissors,
rulers and paper. Invest in a
good encyclopedia and dic-
tionary, and take time to
show your child how to look
up information.
4. Keep in close contact
with your child's teachers.
Teachers encourage parent
involvement. Don't be afraid
to ask your child's teacher
about homework assignments
or your child's progress. Be
sure to attend the fall open
house where teachers outline
their courses, homework
policies and expectations.
This will give you a clearer
idea of what to expect and
how to help your child
succeed.
5. Be a good role model —
read with your child and take
him to the library.
Surround your kids with
books, take time to read to
them and make trips to the
library part of your weekly
routine.
6. Encourage your child to
do his very best and reinforce
his efforts.
Rather than stressing
"Bring home only As;"
encourage children to do their
best and feel proud about
their effort. When you review
their work, try not to criticize;
reinforce the positive effort
and gently offer suggestions
for improvement. Remember,
you are not being graded!

Now Is Your Chance To Learn
A Hobby You've Been Waiting For

• Basic Flower Arranging
• Small Informal Classes
• Your Choice of Evening
Classes Monday-Thursday

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN

For further details contact:

MARKET STREET FLORIST - 357-5810

29633 Franklin Rd., Southfield



PARENTING BRIGHT CHILDREN

FOR

ACHIEVEMENT and SELF-ESTEEM

Registrations now being accepted for classes beginning the week
of September 11. Classes held at the Birmingham YMCA. Limited
space available. Registration deadline September 17.

For'information and registration forms

258-5029

PROUD TO BE . . .

ACHIEVEMENT SERVICES 47 46%

Gerald Kaplan, M.Ed.

Apti

Underachievement diagnosis, group counseling support, parenting classes.
Gerald Kaplan, Consultant for Gifted, Achievement Project Director, Farmington Schools

NURSERY SCHOOL

Fall term begins Wednesday, September 6

• Flexible scheduling to fit your needs
• Full or half-day sessions extended
days
• Lunch/breakfast options
• Enrichment programs: secular and
Judaic
• Certified/experienced teachers
\ • Kindergarten readiness
• Parent Toddler group
-• By Myself group

For further information and application
Call Carol Gale, Director at

NEW FOR FALL
Sunday Parent-Toddler class

356-7378 or 354-1050
United Hebrew Schools' Nursery School
21550 West 12 Mile Road

Southfield, Michigan 48076

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

75

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