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September 01, 1989 - Image 66

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BACK TO SCHOOL

CONGREGATION B'NAI DAVID
SUNDAY SCHOOL IN WEST BLOOMFIELD

Congregation B'nai David, Michigan's largest Traditional Synagogue,
is very proud to announce the OPENING of our exciting new SUN-
DAY SCHOOL in West Bloomfield, located at the Maple/Drake Jewish
Community Center. Classes will begin September 10, 1989 and will
include:

MISS BESSIE'S KINDERSPIEL with Bessie Levin, beloved and ac-
claimed pre-school instructor, formerly with the Jewish Center in Oak
Park. This class will enable 3 and 4 year olds to explore and share
Judaism with their parents on a weekly basis.
AND
K/1 class for children who will be 5 or 6 during the 1989/90 school
year with Mrs. Marla Schloss, experienced instructor and educator.

OPEN HOUSE

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1989
10:00 A.M.-11:30 A.M.

MAPLE/DRAKE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
ROOM 126 - LOWER LEVEL
COME MEET OUR HIGHLY
QUALIFIED INSTRUCTORS
AND LEARN MORE
ABOUT OUR PROGRAMS.
Enrollment is open to MEMBERS and NON-MEMBERS and will be limited.
For inrollment information contact the
C.B.D.S. SCHOOL OFFICE at
557-8210.

STUDENT SPECIAL

Package Includes

Moms Take Note

• Hardwood Frame
• 6" Cotton Futon
• Washable Cloth

Twin
$249
Full
$299
Queen
$339
Other savings throughout store through Labor Day Weekend
*Everyone qualifies — We are all Students of Life

f
- Natural Home Furnishings
306 S. Main • Royal Oak • 548 4422
Mon., Tues. 10-6, Wed.-Fri. 10-9, Sat. 10-6, Sunday 1-5

-

DYSAUTONOMIA

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Pageant Dresses
Tux & Tails
Flower Girl Dresses
Party Dresses

Village Knoll Shopping Center
3616 Maple Rd., Bloomfield Hills
(313) 647-7272

• Selection & Price Unmatched Anywhere
• Tun & Toils — 6 mo. to size 12
S32 75 & up Washable.
• Preemie thru Size 7
• Pony Dresses thru Size 14
• Bears. Porcelain Dolls • Raike Bears

3634 Rochester Rd., Troy
(in Century Plaza)
(313) 689-1844

Hours: M-F 10:00.6:00
Sat. 10:00.5:30

With This Ad Only Thru 9/9/89

Buy 2 Get 1 Free Storewide Sale

66

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1989

No child should be denied
correct diagnosis and proper
treatment . Support the
Dysautonomia Foundation.

Dysautonomia Foundation Inc.

20 E 46th Street Room 302 NY, NY 10017
212/949-6644

College Tactics

Continued from preceding page

missions Pat A. Leonardo
noted, "We appreciated the
macademia nuts sent from a
Hawaiian, though we wish
she would have sent us the
sunshine and blue skies in-
stead."
One applicant to Smith Col-
lege in Massachusetts
brought the admissions office
a "6-foot sculpture . . . in a
trailer. We had to view the
piece in the driveway," said
Sidonia M. Dalby, associate
director of admissions.
Another applicant to a
Boston school was not as
mobile. After the interview,
she started crying.
"What's the matter?" asked
the concerned interviewer.
"Your floor is carpeted," she
responded despondently, re-
vealing her tap shoes and her
disappointment that she
would not be able to give her
planned performance to the
interviewer.
Many students use the ap-
plication's essay section to set
them apart from the rest of
the herd. Some have been em-
broidered on a linen table-
cloth, soaked in perfume,
sealed in a can and written
calligraphy on parchment.
One applicant wrote his essay
on glossy cardboard and cut
into a jigsaw puzzle — to be
reassembled by admissions
officers.
Another essay, sent to
Brandeis, was taped to four
sides of a 9-inch high card-
board pyramid. "His purpose
was to let us know that he
was a three-dimensional per-
son," said Segal. This attempt
was 'cute, but did not demon-
strate any time spent," con-
tinued Segal, who added that
the essay did not fit into a
folder.
Some schools actually ask
for creativity. University of
Pennsylvania used to have a
choice: send Page 217 of a
300-page autobiography or
create something on an 8-and-
a-half by 11-inch piece of
paper.
A University of Pennsyl-
vania applicant approached
another question on pesti-
lence in a unique way. If she
could rid the world of one
thing, what would it be? Not
cancer or the atomic bomb,
two popular choices. This ap-
plicant chose as her target
static cling, according to Dr.
Thomas Johnson, the assis-
tant principal at Troy High
School and a former educa-
tional consultant for his
15-year-old college placement
service.
The University of Maryland
College Park received from
one applicant a "conversation
between his id and ego,
followed by an analysis of

Freudian psychology," accord-
ing to a staffer.
One applicant to Guilford
College in North Carolina
took a shorter approach. He
wrote: "Dear Sir, I'm worth
it!" The committee's response:
"You certainly are!"
One applicant to Rice
University in Houston sent a
poem that concluded:
"There's a chance most thin,
That I'll still get in.
And finally hear you say, 'It's
nice to accept you at Rice."
The admissions office
responded in kind:
"Such a poet shall not be
`Wait Listed thrice.
"We joyously offer you
admission to Rice."
What drives students to
take these walks on the wild
side? Competitivenes is one
answer, but Boston U.'s Kelly

College
admissions offices
have been
entertained by
nude self-portraits,
off-key arias on
tape and
autobiographical
obituaries sent by
high school
seniors trying to
get an edge on
competition.

had a different theory based
on the relatively new rela-
tionship between private
counselors and colleges. "The
feeling on the part of the col-
leges is that they're encourag-
ing this. The feeling on the
part of the counselors is that
colleges aren't paying enough
attention."
But Dr. Thomas Johnson
does not encourage gimmicks.
"I don't think that's a good
technique at all. It's unprofes-
sional, and I think some
prestigious schools become in-
sulted," he said. The excep-
tion, according to Johnson, is
when the addition is related
in some way to the applicant.
"Send what's relevant and
strengthening to the applica-
tion," suggested Marlyn
McGrath Lewis, director of
admissions at Harvard and
Radcliffe. Lewis maintains,
however, "It certanly doesn't
help a case to send something
wacky because then you won-
der why the student's record
isn't strong enough to stand
up on its own."
Similarly, Boston U's Kelly
said that gimmicks can work
against the student — "as if
this student is overcompen-
sating for something weak in
their folder." Kelly said gim-

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