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September 01, 1989 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I LOCAL NEWS I

THE
GIFT
THAT
ALWAYS
FITS.

Fine furniture
accessories and
gifts always
20% off.

8herwood
studios

Tel-Twelve Mall
12 Mile & Telegraph
Daily 10-9
Sunday 12-5
354-9060
Watch for the

Grand Opening of
another Sherwood
in West Bloomfield

Chiropractic Health Hints

BY DR. STANLEY LEVINE, D.C.

EARLY PAINFUL WARNING:
"MORNING AFTER" BACKACHE

People spend countless hours planning a vacation trip or shopping for a new suit
of clothes, yet give little or no thought to an important one-third of their lives — sleep.
If you wake up with a stiff neck every morning, or your back has that "morning after"
feeling when the alarm goes off, it's time to take a good look at your sleeping habits.
Start with your mattress. It should never be extra-soft or extra-hard, just firm enough
to support your weight evenly once you settle in it for the night.
If you sleep on your stomach, you're asking for trouble! For eight hours every night,
your neck is twisted to one side, placing an undue strain on it. Also, the weight of the
spine and back muscles compresses the vital organs and increases swayback.
Equally bad for swayback is sleeping flat on your back. However, placing a pillow
under the knees while sleeping on your back is an excellent way to sleep. This will help
relieve swayback and takes pressure off the vital organs.
Generally speaking, the best way to sleep is on your side with the knees and hips
slightly bent. "Slightly" is the key word here. The knees should be bent at a 30 to 45 degree angle, not doubled
up into the stomach as if you were ready to do a somersault.
When sleeping on the side, it is important to use a flexible pillow which holds the head and neck in a normal
position, not an overstuffed one which tends to push them to one side.
You should begin preparing for sleep an hour or two before going to bed. Reading or watching television are
excellent ways to relax. A leisurely bath or light snack, such as warm milk, can also help you to relax.
These few hints should help you get a good night's sleep, to be able to wake up "fit as a fiddle" rather than
suffering from "morning after" back. However, should that stiff neck or sore back persist, call your Doctor of Chiroprac-
tic. Your problem may be more serious than just poor sleeping habits.

Don't Live With Pain. We Can Help!

LEVINE CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC

31390 Northwestern Hwy., Farmington Hills 48018

855-2666

Dr. Stanley B. Levine • Dr. Stephen M. Tepper • Dr. Robert W. Levine

60

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1989

More than $200,000 in Israel Bond securities were subscribed to at
the recent Congregation Beth Shalom Israel Bond dinner. Shown at
the event are Rabbi David Nelson, Dr. William Korey, honorees
Charles and Fay Isackson, and chairmen Ada and Jerry Efros.

Right To Die Topic
Of Service Meeting

Ahavas Chesed — Bikur
Cholim, the Jewish Visiting
Service of Greater Detroit,
will have its third annual In-
spirational Meeting, on Sept.
12, 8:30 p.m., at the Machon
IlIbrah building in Oak Park.
Guest speaker will be Rab-
bi Elimelech Goldberg, rabbi
of Young Israel of Southfield,
who will speak on "Com-
munity Response to a Life in
Peril." The topic will center
on the religious, moral and
ethical aspects of the right-to-
die issue.
The Jewish Visiting Service
provides volunteers for Bor-
man Hall, Lahser Hills Nur-
sing Center, Mount Vernon
Nursing Center, Sinai
Hospital, and Meals-on-
Wheels. Anew project, called
the "shut-in hot line," will
maintain regular telephone
contact with shut-ins.
All intersted women are in-
vited. Refreshments will be
served. For information, call
Sonia Ribiat, 967-3606.

Sephardim Elect
New Officers

The Sephardic community
of greater Detroit accepted a
new slate of officers at an
election meeting Aug.20.
New officers are: president,
Shirley Behar; first vice-
president, Jacob David; se-
cond vice-president, Alan
Saltiel; treasurer, Albert
Katan; and secretary, Joseph
Tarica.
New board members are:
Richard Behar, Paul Darmon,
Sharon Katan, David Kam,
Sylvie Salie, David Sevy,
Daniel Salama, and Mayer
Salama.
The Sephardic community

has existed in Detroit for 72
years and has held High Ho-
ly Day services every year
since 1917. There are 70
families including people
from Israel, Iraq, Iran, Moroc-
co, Tunisia, Egypt, Greece,
Turkey, Cuba, Brazil, and the
U.S. Call David Chicorel,
355-2604, or Shirley Behar,
557-8551.

Bears Sell For
McDonald House

The Second Annual "Ted-
dy's Track" Bear Auction and
Sale will be Sept. 9 and 10 at
the Sheraton Oaks in Novi.
Last year's sale resulted in a
$5,000 donation to Ronald
McDonald House of Detroit.
All proceeds will again be
donated to McDonald House,
which provides a home away
from home for sick children
and their parents.
On Sept. 9 a banquet will
begin at 6 p.m. At 8 p.m. an
auction of designer bears, an-
tique bears, Steiff bears and
"bear-related items." Ronald
McDonald will be the auc-
tioneer. The auction and ban-
quet are open to the public.
On Sept. 10 there will be
a bear sale and show from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; There is a
charge. For information, call
Sandra Crane, 682-2762.

Rabbi Wine
To Speak

The Center for New Think-
ing will present Rabbi Sher-
win Wine, recently returned
from South America, speak-
ing on "Argentina in Decline:
The Return of the Peronistas."
The lecture will be 10 a.m.
Thursday, in the Somerset
Mall auditorium.
The talk is open to the
public. There is a charge.

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