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September 01, 1989 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

N EWS

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1989

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For Further information call:
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22 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1989

Pope Denounces
Anti-Semitism

Rome (JTA) — Pope John
Paul II issued a ringing
denunciation of anti-
Semitism this weekend, in an
apostolic letter addressed to
all Catholics.
"I want to restate with force
that hostility and hate toward
Judaism are in complete con-
tradiction to the Christian vi-
sion of the dignity of man,"
the pontiff declared.
The 20-page letter was
released to mark the 50th an-
niversary of the start of World
War II, when German forces
invaded Poland on Sept. 1,
1939.
It spoke at length and with
poignancy of the horrors of
the Holocaust and the par-
ticular sufferings of the Jews
of Poland, where this pope
was born.
The letter could be taken as
an attempt to ease the ten-
sions between the Catholic
Church and world Jewry over
a convent on the grounds of
the former Auschwitz death
camp, which the church pro-
mised more than two years
ago to relocate but never has.
While the letter stressed
that all groups persecuted by
the Nazis should be
remembered, the pope was
especially eloquent about
Jewish suffering.
"Among all anti-human
measures, there is one which
remains forever a disgrace for
humanity: the barbaric plan
which was ruthlessly launch-
ed against the Jewish people,"
the letter said.
"The Jews of Poland, more
than others, lived through
that calvary: The images of
the siege of the Warsaw Ghet-
to, like what we know about
the concentration camps of
Auschwitz, Majdanek or
Treblinka, go beyond that
which is humanly possible to
imaginer the pope's letter
said.
But if the pope's denuncia-
tion of the Holocaust and
anti-Semitism was aimed at
defusing the convent con-
troversy, Polish Cardinal
Josef Glemp added fuel to the
fire.
He delivered a sharp ser-
mon Saturday in
Czestochowa criticizing Jews
for their "arrogant" attitude
toward the Auschwitz
convent.
In his sermon, the Polish
Catholic primate asked the
Jewish people not to "talk to
us from the position of a na-
tion raised above all others,
and do not dictate terms that
are impossible to fulfill."
Glemp also implied that

Jewish influence was poison-
ing the international news
media against Poland.
"Your power is the mass
media at your disposal in
many countries. Let them not
serve to spread anti-
Polonism," Glemp said.
Glemp called on the Jews in
the media not to glorify the
"seven Jews from New York"
who "launched an attack
against the convent in
Auschwitz?'
He was referring to a July
14 demonstration led by Rab-
bi Avraham Weiss of New
York. When the protestors
entered the convent grounds
to protest its continued
presence, they were beaten by
convent workers and dragged
off the grounds.
Shortly afterward, the ar-
chbishop of Krakow, Cardinal
Franciszek Macharski, an-
nounced he was canceling the
agreement to move the con-
vent to an interfaith center
that would be built away from
the convent grounds.

Palestinian
Granted Asylum

Tel Aviv (JTA) France
granted asylum to one of Five
Palestinians deported from
the west Bank.
Dr. Taysir Aruri, who
taught physics at Bir Zeit
University in the West Bank
until it was shut down by the
Israeli authorities, was ex-
pected in Paris.
He is one of five Palesti-
nians whose final appeals
against expulsion were re-
jected by Israel's High Court
of Justice last week. All were
expelled.
Israel claims that the men,
who have records of security
offenses and have long been
in custody, are leaders of the
Palestinian uprising in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
Setting something of a
precedent, Israeli authorities
permitted the five to select
where he wanted to be
deported.
Aruri, who is a member of
the Palestinian Communist
Party, chose France. He said
he feared for his life if sent to
Lebanon, the place where
Israel usually expels those it
deems security risks.
The other four deportees
were flown by helicopter to
the southern Lebanon securi-
ty zone, where they were
given medical checkups and
some money before friends
drove their further north.

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