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September 01, 1989 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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20

FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 1. 1989

students participated in the
annual national sports corn-
petiton. Today, under his
guidance, that number has in-
creased to more than 13,000.
His greatest satisfaction,
however, has come from his
work with young immigrant
Jews from Ethiopia. Opera-
tion Moses brought thou-
sands of youngsters from
Ethiopia to Youth Aliyah in-
stitutions, providing those in-
stitutions with an enormous
educational challenge.
Chrichstein perceived im-
mediately that sports could
foster a positive self-image in
the new Israelis.
The special program he
developed for the new im-
migrants soon showed results,
and national championships
in gymnastics and field
events were soon followed by
participation in international
events. In the most recent na-
tional competitions, im-
migrants from Ethiopia won
all of the first prizes, both in-
dividual and group, in the
running events.

IDF Reservist:

.rnsellisomm
illa ■■■■■■■■a■.
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FOR

----7-
- --•

Haifa — What made
Shimon Chrichstein a cham-
pion representing the Soviet
in the hurdles of the 1956
Melbourne Olympics has
helped him to make a difficult
transition. After Chrichs-
tein's daighter immigrated to
Israel in the early 1970s, he
lost his job as deputy director
of sports at Chernovitch
University. Buy 1980,
Chrichstein followed her to
Israel with his wife and son.
Chrichstein recalls his
training for his Israeli
teaching license as nothing
short of traumatic. "I was
then 54 years old," the burly
athletic remembers, "sitting
at a desk with 24-year-olds,
learning Hebrew. And it was
hard." But the effort has paid
off. Shortly after he began
teaching, Chrichstein was ap-
pointed director of sports for
the Jewish Agency's Youth
Aliyah department, a position
he still holds.
When Chrichstein began
his work with Youth Aliyah,
only a few hundred of his

No Hit Squads

ER SPE



Soviet Jews Keeps
Immigrants Running

Tel Aviv (JTA) — An officer
in the Israel Defense Force
reserves is denying that he
trained "hit squads" for the
drug cartels operating in
Colombia.
Reserve Lt. Col. Yair Klein
said the company he heads,
Hod Hahanit, worked in Col-
ombia about 18 months ago
training security guards for
farmers and cattle ranchers.
But the case, first reported
on American television last
week, has triggered an in-
vestigation by the Defense
Ministry and discussion in
the Knesset.
It has focused attention on
the activities of many retired
IDF officers as free-lancers
training paramilitary groups
in parts of the world remote
from Israel.
Klein contended that the
people who employed him and
several of his former IDF col-
leagues needed military
training to combat guerrillas
and cattle rustlers their
government was unable to
control.
He insisted they had
nothing to do with drug traf-
fickers, citing the relatively
small amount of money he
said his clients were able to
pay for his services.
Israel Television identified

him last week as the man
alleged by NBC News to be a
mercenary employed by the
drug cartel.
One of the men spoke
Hebrew on the videotape,
which was translated to
Spanish. The film was shown
by Israel Thlevision, which
identified the speaker as
Klein.
He said the Defense
Ministry questioned him at
that time about rumors of
drug involvement, which he
denied. Klein admitted,
however, that drug interests
could have become involved in
the training program after
his departure from Colombia.
Klein may be in trouble
with the Defense Ministry,
which licenses the export of
Israeli military equipment
and know-how. He insists his
company did not require a
license to work for private in-
terests in Colombia, though it
was denied one to deal with a
government body there.
The Defense Ministry is
reported to be continuing its
investigations. The matter is
also on the agenda of the
Knesset Foreign Affairs and
Defense Committee.
The Foreign Ministry said if
the report was true, the in-
dividuals involved were ac-

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